Born in Cuba in 1970, Hernández moved to Europe in 2003 and currently lives and works between Havana and Düsseldorf

Groups

“I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Group exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary, London

I never thought I’d see you again. Where have you been until now? Well how are you? how have you been? It’s a long time since we last met. Roxy Music, “Chance Meeting” “ never thought I’d see you again” is not exactly about history painting. Neither obliged to any style, nor explicitly referential to particular precedents, the exhibition begins with the premise that painting, more than any medium, is always driven by its own genres. Painting is persistent in the history of art precisely because of the specificity of the styles and idioms it adopts or quotes. Even if contemporary painting is underpinned by a conceptual framework, it is almost impossible to avoid some reference to that almost infinite list of established modes – landscape, portrait, still life, formalist, expressionist, to name a few. But rather than painting being a reiteration of its past, the recognition of, and resistance to, these conventions makes it a site of constant renewal. No longer bound to such polarities as figuration or abstraction, contemporary practice takes the idea of painting as a given. It co-opts genres without hierarchy or priority, and as a type of shorthand or economy of expression. That is to say, we recognise something in the ‘style’ of the painting. We speak its language, because many of the conventions of painting are all around us in the visual information we negotiate every day. We recognise the conventions, from perspective to painterly gesture, even if those conventions are put to work for different purposes. And it is less about what an image in the painting might convey, than the means through which that image or gesture is achieved. The exhibition does not try to find a unified style for painting today, but recognises that there are modes in which the painter may operate, perhaps without long-term commitment, but also without irony. Painting is never without reference, context or precedent. It always carries with it many memories and legacies and at the same time appears thoroughly regenerated. “I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Mike Bouchet and Paul McCarthy, Jason Brooks, Agnieska Brzeżańska, Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, Pamela Golden, Diango Hernández, Natelle Jubelin, Koen van den Broek, Ian Whittlesea 21 January – 27 February 2015 Private View: 20 January 2015 ...

The space between private and public property Benefiz Auktion. Saturday 6 December 2014, 7—9 PM. NAK, Aachen, Germany

Opens: Saturday 6 December 2014, 7—9 PM Runs: 7 December—21 December 2014 NAK Neuer Aachener Kunstverein Passstraße 29, 52070 Aachen Tel. +49 (0) 241-503255 Fax +49 (0) 241-536848 info@neueraachenerkunstverein.de www.neueraachenerkunstverein.de “The space between private and public property” Diango Hernández 2014 18 x 18 x 16 cm Two original Cuban license plates (the yellow is for private cars and the blue is for public/state cars) “Dictator’s finger” Diango Hernández 2014 9.5 x 10 x 6 cm Bronze casted finger and plastic ...

Commemorating Hurricanes Salon 2014 / 2015 Jahresgaben-Ausstellung, Kunstverein Nürnberg, Germany

Diango Hernández (*1970, Sancti Spìritus, Kuba; lebt in Düsseldorf) hat im Kunstverein Nürnberg dieses Jahr die Einzelausstellung „In hazard, translated“ präsentiert. In dieser hat er skulpturale Assemblagen ausgelegt, die sich mit einer vielschichtigen Lesbarkeit von Geschichte beschäftigen. Ausgehend von dem historischen Ereignis eines Hurrikans, der 1932 die Südostküste Kubas zerstört hat, entwickelte er eigene bildliche Übersetzungen, um einen differenzierten Blick auf die gegenwärtige Situation in seinem Heimatland sowie in Europa zu ...

Entorno Crítico Group exhibition at CAB de Burgos with Diango Hernández

Juicio al presente en el CAB El Foro de la Cultura orquesta ‘Entorno crítico’, con obras de la colecciones CaixaBank-Caja de Burgos y Musac que abordan la realidad desde varios prismas por A.S.R. 10/10/2014 os caminos del Centro de Arte Caja de Burgos (CAB) y del Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (Musac) se vuelven a cruzar, y sin posibilidad de escapatoria, por obra y gracia del I Foro de la Cultura. Entorno crítico. El presente en un brete en las colecciones Caja de Burgos-CaixaBank-MUSAC selecciona a veinticuatro artistas que cuestionan la realidad, que la abordan desde la poesía, que buscan respuestas, que conjuran la naturaleza, que meten el dedo en sus llagas, que plantean, proponen y dudan, que se solidarizan, que saben reír y llorar… Eva Lootz , Do Ho Suh, Geert Goiris, Narda Alvarado, Iván Navarro, Gabriel Kondratiuk, Allan Sekula, Javier Gutiérrez Orrico, Marjk Bijl, Marcel van Eden, Mateo Maté, Eulalia Valldosera, Cao Guimaraes, Corinna Schint, Diango Hernández, Lara Almarcegui, Sven Pahlson, Meiro Koizumi, Simeón Saiz, Gregorio Méndez, Pors & Rao, Jors Laarman, Francesco Jodice y Marjetica Potrc sientan al presente en el banquillo y lo interrogan, lo abordan desde distintos prismas y vuelcan las conclusiones en sus obras. No dictan sentencia. Eso se lo dejan al espectador. Hablan del conflicto emocional de los inmigrantes, sopesan el valor del progreso como motor de la historia, denuncian los desmanes urbanísticos y los políticos, se cuelan en la mente del individuo para bucear en sus contradicciones, reflejan dispares realidades sociales… «Vivimos tiempos de cambio, de transformaciones, de incertidumbres. El mundo que heredamos cuando en 2005 se inauguró el Musac era conflictivo y diez años después no deja de ser más inseguro. El arte tiene muchas funciones y una de ellas es documentar qué ocurre a nuestro alrededor. Las instituciones, los artistas y las obras respiran el aire de problemas en que vivimos y este aire se condensa en esta muestra», ilustra el director del Musac, Manuel Olveira, que entre estos nubarrones también ve un rayo de sol: «Todo tiene arreglo y salida y parte de ella está en el arte, que es un vector de transformación y generación social, un espacio en el que podemos encontrar horizontes de todo tipo». Su colega del CAB, Emilio Navarro, observa que ha descubierto que hay ideas que se repiten como las falsas apariencias y la capacidad imaginativa y creativa del ser humano para resistir en territorios hostiles tanto urbanos como naturales… Y ahí está el arte. source: El correo de Burgos 10/10/2014 ...

Bringing Light into a Windowless Room Group exhibition with Diango Hernández, Matt Mullican, Christopher Williams at Capitain Petzel, Berlin

2006 Diango Hernández exhibited nine painted objects on a four and a half times thirteen and a half meter floor drawing in Oscar Niemeyers’ exhibition building at the 27th São Paulo Biennal. The objects quote architectural elements of the modernist Avenida Paulista in São Paulo, a boulevard with one shaded and one sunny ...

New Paintings Group exhibiton with Matthew Benedict, Robert Bordo, Diango Hernandez, Stefan Kuerten and Sylvia Plimack Mangold at Alexander and Bonin, NY

First shown in his recent solo exhibition, In hazard, translated, at Kunstverein Nürnberg, Diango Hernández’s new paintings, 'Fruits, I sell Fruits', present fresh fruits in precise arrangements on plywood panels. Comprised of mangos, lemons, watermelons, bananas, oranges and limes, Hernández examines the cultural and historical connotations of “tropical fruits” and colonial notions of ...

Salon distingué – Household effects in good company Group exhibiton curated by Nadia Schneider Willen at Museum Langmatt, Baden

oused in a villa built by an industrialist in the early twentieth century, Museum Langmatt still reflects the needs, values and tastes of a certain social class – of people for whom surrounding themselves with exquisite, precious artefacts and works of art was very much part of their identity. The exhibition Salon distingué is an inquiry into Household Effects in Good Company and as such addresses the functional complexity of the Villa Langmatt as stage, exhibition space and time machine rolled into one. Faced with the challenge of curating a contemporary art project in a fully furnished interior with an impressive inventory of its own, it made sense to use the domestic character of this manorial villa as cover for smuggling new and unexpected works into an established ensemble. On entering the bedrooms appropriated as exhibition space and the much grander ground-floor reception rooms, visitors therefore find themselves face to face with contemporary sculptures and objects positioned – at times discreetly, at times ostentatiously – alongside the existing household effects. What all these works of art have in common is the way they start with objects of everyday use – tables, lamps, tableware, plastic bottle caps and such like – and then, by rendering them unusable, combining them with other objects, or translating them into some other material, transplant them from the utilitarian milieu into the realm of the exhibit. Haegue Yang is interested in everyday life, which in her eyes is certainly not without its mystical aspects. Venetian blinds, light bulbs, and DIY supplies play a crucial role in her installations, and even her smaller works, including those presented here, can be read as a kind of homage to the banal. Her Roll Cosies of 2012, for example, consists of a group of cash register rolls tucked inside knitted cosies, as if the paper on which all future purchases will be recorded were somehow in need of warmth and protection. In Diango Hernández’s installation Dining at Eight of 2009, comprising four tables at which “figures” made of stacked lampshades sit opposite each other, household effects are used as culturally coded materials that the artist reconfigures to make them tell new stories. Bearing in mind the individual objects’ place of origin, their points of reference include the conditions of their own production and the underlying socioeconomic power gap. Dirty Fountain, a concrete sculpture of 2006 by Monika Sosnowska, looks like something out of a facelessly functionalist Soviet milieu. Installed in front of the villa, however, this drinking fountain is anything but functional: the addition of black pigment has rendered its water undrinkable thus undermining its raison d’être.   “Salon distingué – Household Effects in Good Company” 4 May – 30 November 2014 Museum Langmatt Stiftung Langmatt Sidney und Jenny Brown Römerstrasse 30 CH – 5401 Baden / AG info@langmatt.ch Salon distingué – display and dramatization The focus of Salon distingué is not on household effects alone, however. By playing on the “salon” concept, it also seeks to shed light on social display and dramatization as essential aspects of the upper-class lifestyle, which accordingly are reflected in the interiors they inhabited. While the French word salon can also mean la bonne compagnie, a definition it derives from the “people of quality” who liked to congregate in such illustrious reception rooms, the title Salon distingué is an allusion to more than just the “salons de conversation” of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Paris. The word salon also calls to mind the annual exhibition of paintings and sculptures that for a long time was the most important art show of them all. The former residence of the wealthy Brown family was the fulfilment of a personal dream, the material embodiment of the perfectly composed front and hence a visualization of how such a family wanted to be seen, namely as distinguished – that is to say genteel, cultivated – members of the upper echelons of society. At the heart of this mise en scène was the private picture gallery that was added shortly after the villa itself was finished, in part to house the family’s growing collection of paintings and in part as a venue for elegant receptions. Even in the days when the Villa Langmatt was inhabited and in its prime, it served as a stage for exemplary dramatizations of the upper-class lifestyle – an exhibition space before the fact, as it were. Now institutionalized as a museum, the Villa Langmatt houses a permanent collection that reconstructs the family’s erstwhile showcasing of itself and its values and in doing so becomes a materialization of family history. In this respect, Salon distingué is an exhibition about exhibiting, whose theme is the staging of objects and the possible scenarios that such objects and their stagings imply. Natalie Czech’s object photographs of LPs and clocks are inscribed with literary texts that turn the act of viewing into an act of reading. Kathrin Sonntag’s slide installation Blame it on Morandi of 2011, meanwhile, engages tautologically with a plethora of references to classical still life painting, which as object dramatization par excellence has provided an allegorical vehicle for such philosophical matters as mortality and death ever since the seventeenth century. Household Effects in Good Company – objects on stage Like stand-ins for the human protagonists who have long since exited the stage they built themselves for acting out their social roles, the household effects now become players in their own right. This alerts us to their function as screens for the projection of individual fantasies, ranging from the quotidian rituals and foibles of the villa’s former owners to their unfulfilled desires and the tacit division of power within the Brown family system. Items of furniture thus take on anthropomorphic traits; works of art suddenly start to speak. The 2007 video Drama Queens by Elmgreen & Dragset shows an empty stage on which iconic twentieth-century sculptures discuss what it is like to be gazed at so relentlessly, the conditions of their existence, their everyday woes. In a series of ...

Beyond the Supersquare Group exhibition curated by Holly Block and María Inés Rodríguez at the Bronx Museum, NY

eyond the Supersquare explores the indelible influence of Latin American and Caribbean modernist architecture on contemporary art. The exhibition features 30 artists and more than 60 artworks, including photography, video, sculpture, installation, and drawing, that respond to major Modernist architectural projects constructed in Latin America and the Caribbean from the 1920s through the 1960s. Beyond the Supersquare examines the complicated legacies of modernism through architecture and thought—as embodied by the political, economic, environmental, and social challenges faced by countries throughout Latin America—through the unique perspective of artists working today. This exhibition is co-organized by Holly Block (New York City) and María Inés Rodríguez (Colombia), and designed by Benedeta Monteverde (Mexico). Artists in the exhibition include: Leonor Antunes (Portugal), Alexander Apóstol (Venezuela), Alexandre Arrechea (Cuba), Felipe Arturo (Colombia), Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck (Venezuela), Alberto Baraya (Colombia), Carlos Bunga (Portugal), Los Carpinteros (Cuba), Jordi Colomer (Spain), Livia Corona (Mexico), Rafael Domenech (Cuba), Felipe Dulzaides (Cuba), Fernanda Fragateiro (Portugal), Magdalena Fernández (Venezuela), Carlos Garaicoa (Cuba), Mario Garcia Torres (Mexico), Terence Gower (Canada), Patrick Hamilton (Belgium/Chile), Diango Hernández (Cuba), Quisqueya Henriquez (Cuba), Andre Komatsu (Brazil), Runo Lagomarsino (Argentina), Pablo Leon de la Barra (Mexico), Maria Martinez Cañas (Cuba), Daniela Ortiz (Peru), Jorge Pardo (Cuba), Manuel Piña (Cuba), Ishmael Randall-Weeks (Peru), Mauro Restiffe (Brazil), Pedro Reyes (Mexico), and Chemi Rosado (Puerto Rico). María Inés Rodríguez is the Director of CAPC Contemporary Art Museum Bordeaux. Her previous positions include chief curator at MUAC (Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo) in Mexico City, and at MUSAC (Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León), Spain, where she was also director of the collection Arte y Arquitectura, as well as guest curator of the Satellite Program at Jeu de Paume, Paris. Currently, she lives and works in Bordeaux. Beyond the Supersquare is made possible with major funding from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, with additional support from Acción Cultural Española; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation; The Consulate General of Colombia/New York; Embassy of Colombia; Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo; Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund; Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; Agnes Gund; Toby Devan Lewis; The National Endowment for the Arts; The O’Grady Foundation; Sciame Construction; The Evelyn Toll Family Foundation; and The Venezuelan American Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks to Aeroméxico; The Architect’s Newspaper; Walter Puryear and the Andrew Freedman Home of the Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council; and Galia Solomonoff.   Beyond the Supersquare May 1, 2014 – Jan. 11, 2015 1040 Grand Concourse Bronx, NY 10456, US +1 718-681-6000 www.bronxmuseum.org/ ...