Born in Cuba in 1970, Hernández moved to Europe in 2003 and currently lives and works between Havana and Düsseldorf

Groups

The Ripe Fruit Theory Art Cologne (Collaborations) with Capitain Petzel. 10th-13th April 2014

he aim of the Art Cologne “Collaborations” section is to point up new artistic parallels and to spark interaction – for example between an emerging gallery and an established gallery, or between different artistic trends, styles and approaches across national borders.   401 Contemporary, Berlin Arcade, London + Tatjana Pieters, Gent Bischoff Projects, Frankfurt + Blanket/Natalia Hug, Cologne Thomas Brambilla, Bergamo + Jan Kaps, Cologne Ellen de Bruijne, Amsterdam Callicoon, New York + Christian Lethert, Cologne Shane Campbell, Chicago Canada, New York + Jack Hanley, New York Capitain Petzel, Berlin Choi Lager, Cologne + Thomas Schulte, Berlin Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago Kalfayan, Athens/Thessaloniki Krome, Berlin Tanya Leighton, Berlin + Off Vendome, Düsseldorf Max Mayer, Düsseldorf + Supportico Lopez, Berlin Nanzuka, Tokyo + Warhus Rittershaus, Cologne Neon Parc, Melbourne Neue Alte Brücke, Frankfurt + Société, Berlin Thomas Rehbein, Cologne + Stalke, Copenhagen Salon 94, New York + Henrik Springmann, Berlin Stigter van Doesburg, Amsterdam The Hole, New York + V1, Copenhagen source: http://www.artcologne.com/en/artcologne/ausstellersuche/collaboration/index.php Art Cologne April 16, April 19 2014   ...

The readers alone Group exhibition curated by Angelika Nollert and Yilmaz Dziewior at "Utopia starts small" Fellbach Triennial of small-scale sculpture, Germany

iango Hernández brings together heterogeneous elements – either found of his own – to form new configurations in his work. His poetic combinations suggest possibilities for the individual and free handling of aesthetics and political systems. Books with their store of views and knowledge of manifold spatial and temporal origins often serve him as a metaphor. ‘Certainly there is a lot going on inside any bookshelf and I am sure that in any of them live perfectly together differences and contradictions coexists in a very peaceful way. I love to think that we are nothing but books that have been written by many different people, in many different places but if we are books what are books then?’ 1 The readers, alone (2013) also revolves around books and the figure of the reader. A display panel lying on the floor serves as support for various arrangements of three pairs of bookends. Compared to the panel, these bookends seem small and model-like. But precisely this emptiness and the absence of books is what enables the bookends to rehearse new ‘positions’; a certain historical forgetfulness, according to Hernández, is a precondition of social revolutions. 2 On an adjacent upright display panel Hernández combines a dried plant with the title of a book by René Dumont, cofounder of the French Green Party: L’utopie ou la mort! (1973) – Reminiscence for Hernández of various slogans coined by Fidel Castro, such as Freedom or death’, ‘Socialism or death’, etc. Both objects are presented in plastic sleeves and convey a sense of vulnerability and the need of protection, while the display panels – recycle from an exhibition – suggest a past the remains of which are fragmentarily preserved. The readers, alone embodies the potential of productive readers and readings to generate new meanings from isolation, blank spaces and absences. Astrid Wege   1 Diango Hernández, EL manual del tractorista arrepentido, Zona Maco, Mexico City, 2009. Source: www.diango.net. 2 E-mail correspondence with the artists, 16.04.2013. Text published in in the catalogue of: Utopie Beginnt im kleinen. -12. Triennale Kleinplastik Felbach. “Utopia starts small” uses the concept of Utopia and knowledge of how it has been exploited and misused in the course of history. At the same time, however, it also recognises its positive connotations. The exhibition sees a particular potential for this definition of the format, wherein a small scale can be interpreted as a nucleus for social and political change. This is especially remarkable because until now two features in particular have traditionally been attributed to small-scale sculptures: a small format or dimension on the one hand and on the other the claim to be a finished, autonomous work of art. In modern times, however, we can observe that another form of small-scale sculpture has developed. Artists who address the idea of Utopian models are extending the limited definition of the genre to date, thus overcoming its formal limitation to small format and completeness. The 12th Fellbach Triennial concentrates on the significance of small-scale sculpture in the sense of a Utopian model. The premise is small format, and miniature dimensions are in the focus of interest. “Utopia starts small” pursues a contentual bias of small-scale sculpture as a model draft. As a result there is a productive contradiction between the fact that on the one hand the draft can be seen as a work of art in its own right, regardless of whether it is later to be realised in a larger format, and that at the same time it also contains the mental potential for change. A total of about fifty artists of all generations will be represented at the 2013 12th Triennial of Small-scale Sculpture. Going beyond art, the exhibition examines exemplary approaches from architecture, theatre and design. In addition to historical positions, the focus will be on contemporary young artists whose works have largely arisen in situations of upheaval in Eastern Europe, Latin America and Asia. By casting its attention increasingly on locations outside Europe, the 12th Triennial is reacting not only directly to our current global situation, but also forming a reference to the former editions of the Fellbach presentations based on the continents. The accompanying catalogue with the same title includes, in addition to articles about the exhibiting artists, four scholarly essays dealing with: the socio-political significance of Utopia in its historical development; the thematization and development of Utopian models in art; and the aesthetics of small scale. The authors are Sarat Maharaj, Dieter Roestraete, Thomas Schölderle and Kerstin Stakemeier.   Armando Andrade Tudela / Leonor Antunes / Ei Arakawa & Nikolas Gambaroff / Anna Artaker / Vojin Bakic´ / Neïl Beloufa / Bless Arno / Brandlhuber / Teresa Burga / Luis Camnitzer / Nina Canell / Lygia Clark / Nathan Coley / Thea Djordjadze / Maria Eichhorn / Michaela Eichwald / Felix Ensslin & Studierende* / Geoffrey Farmer / Yona Friedman / Meschac Gaba / Carlos Garaicoa / Isa Genzken / Konstantin Grcic / Günter Haese / Diango Hernández / Judith Hopf / Iman Issa / Christian Jankowski & Studierende* / Rachel Khedoori / Bodys Isek Kingelez / Jakob Kolding / Moshekwa Langa / Manuela Leinhoß / Anita Leisz / Anna Maria Maiolino / Victor Man / Cildo Meireles / Michaela Melián / Michele Di Menna / Charlotte Moth / Timo Nasseri / Manfred Pernice / Pratchaya Phinthong / Falke Pisano / Erwin Piscator / Rita Ponce de León / Vjenceslav Richter / Yorgos Sapountzis / Jochen Schmith / Nora Schultz / Eckhard Schulze-Fielitz / Yutaka Sone / Ettore Sottsass / Pascale Marthine / Tayou Joëlle / Tuerlinckx / Danh Võ / Haegue Yang. ...

Mother let’s paint it together Group exhibition curated by Christina Végh and Fanny Gonella at "HERstories" at Bonner Kunstverein, Germany

or the exhibition commemorating its 50th anniversary, the Bonner Kunstverein has invited artists to respond to an exceptional aspect of its previous exhibition program: from early on and “in marked contrast to the machismo of the time” (Jürgen Harten), the Kunstverein has extensively presented female positions from the field of contemporary art. “HERstories” examines the legacy of artistic strategies developed by women artists since the nineteen sixties based on exhibitions organized by the Kunstverein over the last half century. The wide range of works includes videos and performances, paintings, costumes, sex toys, books, puppets and wallpaper. Not only are various methodologies, contexts and questions juxtaposed with each other here, but the exhibits drawn from different generations also make up the foundation for a dialogue that establishes unexpected perspectives for the present day. The participating artists have for the most part developed new projects that reflect multifaceted dealings with the body and occasionally contain a performative dimension. Some of the contributions have been produced collaboratively, others underscore how questions and strategies raised by women have influenced the artistic practices of their male colleagues. They jointly pose questions about how the status, role and self-awareness of women in art have changed and remind us about the extent to which feminist debates have transformed the art world in recent decades. The exhibition’s title derives from the neologism “herstory,” a term coined in 1970 by the American feminist, author and publisher Robin Morgan as a counterweight to “history.” With this word she called for an alternative historiography in which women can find their place as active participants. An accompanying symposium featuring artists and academics on June 23 takes up this challenge, addressing historical and contemporary discussions. In their dealings with the Kunstverein’s exhibition history, some of the invited artists recognized orientation points for their own practice, others discovered complementary approaches or close affinities. NICOLAS PARTY (b. 1980, Switzerland) for example presents his still lifes in the context of paintings of men and women by MIRIAM CAHN (b. 1949, Basel) that together lead to a dialogue concerning corporeality and inner space. RITA McBRIDE (b. 1960, Iowa) developed a picture together with MARLENE DUMAS (b. 1953, Cape Town) that serves as the basis for an expanded presentation of works by MELISSA GORDON (b. 1981, Boston), PETRA MAITZ (b. 1962, Austria) and ANNE PÖHLMANN (b. 1978, Dresden). As a former Peter Mertes grant holder, MONIKA BAER (b. 1964, Freiburg im Breisgau) has chosen by contrast to reference herself, continuing the process of questioning her own artistic identity in the presentation of earlier pictures. CHRISTIAN FALSNAES (b. 1980, Copenhagen) sees a link between his filmed performances produced at the Kunstverein with residents of Bonn and MARIANNE WEX’s (b. 1937, Hamburg) poetical attempt to record gender typologies. DIANGO HERNANDEZ (b. 1970, Cuba) encountered a related iconoclastic as well as emotional means of dealing with architecture in the artistic practice of FRIEDERIKE TEBBE (b. 1961, Hannover). In her theatrical performances and videos, SPARTACUS CHETWYND (b. 1973, London) felt herself inspired by the unashamedness and grandiosity in the films of KATHARINA SIEVERDING (b. 1944, Prague). SUSE WEBER (b. 1970, Leipzig) kept the book on CHARLOTTE SALOMON’s (b. 1917, Berlin, d. 1943, Auschwitz-Birkenau) cycle “Life? or Theatre?” with her for a long time and furthermore asks where this division lies in society and in everyday life. Works by women artists selected from the Kunstverein’s exhibition history will accompany this group presentation or the supporting program. In conjunction with the central symposium, the HERstories exhibition invites visitors to rediscover important decades in the history of art and of the Kunstverein. It bridges the generations, emphasizes the on-going relevance of historical themes as well as their development over the years in new questions. And particularly now, on our 50th birthday, we are faced more than ever with the question: What foundation has our history laid for the present day?   with: Monika Baer  / Rita Mcbride / Marlene Dumas / Melissa Gordon / Petra Maitz / Anne Pöhlmann / Spartacus Chetwynd / Katharina Sieverding / Christian Falsnaes / Marianne Wex / Diango Hernández / Friederike Tebbe / Nicolas Party / Miriam Cahn / Suse Weber / Charlotte Salomon BONNER KUNSTVEREIN Hochstadenring 22 D-53119 Bonn T: +49 228 693936 F: +49 228 695589 E: kontakt@bonner-kunstverein.de ...

Visible (Homage to the square and colonialism) at ArtCologne 2013 with Marlborough Contemporary, London

he book pages with furniture images that I used for these series of collages come from a 1930′s German book about colonial furniture style. Still in the 18th century for many Europeans the Colonies were remote and dangerous places, only suitable for the adventurers minds, around the late 19th century the western world ‘rediscovered’ the colonies. For this time, as the Romantics did before with the ancient civilizations, the western world found a new spiritual refuge in the colonies. The so-called ‘Colonial style’ was coined in the early 20th century and the Colonial style package included: mystery and a ‘pure’ spiritual aura. Albers’ ‘Homage to the square’ extensive series of paintings and studies about color fields, is for me one of the most intriguing artistic strategies of the 20th century. As we know Albers introduced only subtle changes in the formal structure of these series of paintings, in his color field paintings the relevant changes come from the variation and perception of color itself. Albers’ ‘Homage to the Square’ represents to me an extraordinary reflection on perception in general. Formal changes are detected more easily by our senses but color changes are way more subtle, only the good and keen observer can tell when they have changed. The squares in Albers are for me isolated areas, they are well defined frontiers as if they were boundaries definitions in a colonial Mapa Mundi, only the colors can eventually change but the isolation and restrictions are a permanent circumstance, a formal and structural fatality. I altered the title of Albers’ series in the same way I decided to substitute in each painting a color filed by an strange layer (a book page). In this way the squares are no longer limits, they became stratus. They hold and give support to each other but unfortunately the ones under can’t be properly seen. I just forgot an speculative remark -The notion of order proposed / imposed by Germany in the actual European economy maybe represents a new beginning for colonialism. Albers was one of the German Bauhaus artists that contributed to define the ‘New laws’ of perception and understanding of co-relations between a physical fact and a psychic effect. The Gestalt psychologists greatly influenced Albers practice, specially Rudolf Arnheim. Order is a necessary condition for anything the human mind is to understand. Arrangements such as the layout of a city or building, a set of tools, a display of merchandise, the verbal exposition of facts or ideas, or a painting or piece of music are called orderly when an observer or listener can grasp their overall structure and the ramification of the structure in some detail. Order makes it possible to focus on what is alike and what is different, what belongs together and what is segregated. When nothing superfluous is included and nothing indispensable left out, one can understand the interrelation of the whole and its parts, as well as the hierarchic scale of importance and power by which some structural features are dominant, other subordinate. When order comes from disciplined creative processes could develop into a reactionary doctrine. Introducing doubts into logical order allows us to create mistakes, which are for me the fundamentals assets of positive development. One of the most known maxims of the Gestalt psychologists is: “The whole is greater than the sum of the parts” The last layer, let’s call it the visible and the one that can easily be removed, come from Fidel Castro’s speech about Che’s death in Bolivia. Somehow his death marked a very important moment for the post-colonial times. That’s the last layer of each one of the collages, a pinned floating book page, the only layer in that piece that can be easily replaced. I guess the only layer that can also easily be added to many other complicated juxtapositions of historical contemporary events. ...

Lestory Group exhibition "Arqueológica" curated by Virginia Torrente at Matadero, Madrid

“Probing the LESTORY (Lessons in History)” by Nuno Faria Archeology is nothing more than a re-writing: that is, preserved in the form of exteriority, a regulated transformation of what has already been written. It is not a return to the innermost secret of the origin; it is the systematic description of the discourse-object. Michel Foucault  utopia yet to be created, an unfinished design, a monument-atopy, a map without places: Who could respond with certainty? Diango Hernández’s installation for the Arqueológica exhibition poses more than one question and seems to establish itself as a Sphynx-like puzzle of Greco-Roman-style inspiration, at the very heart of darkness of a glorious civilization in decline, unable to breath again, lacking imagination to formulate new utopias, paralyzed by the fear of failure. Foundation is the word that comes to mind, and it is not strange that it be thus, dealing with an exhibition whose theme is not only current but necessary for the undertaking of this urgent descent into darkness. What is archaeology, in short, and what purpose does it serve to dig in search of remains? What mechanisms drive objects given to darkness, and what sort of work might reactivate them? What sort of vision do they proffer up? What sort of knowledge arises from contact with these objects, from either the sensory experience had or the knowledge that we carry inside ourselves or the projection in space of the purpose for which they were designed? How does one reactivate the past in the present? Archaeology is a transversal science spanning all of man’s knowledge about mankind, because it doesn’t just seek depth- that negative space that defines that which cannot be seen, which no state of mind can do. Gestures that scrutinize gestures, knowledge of what is tactile, material, where distance is dizzily banished. Conjuring up a presence, inventing the possibility of imagining that negative space in which there are no words, nor body, nor image- only the complete and joyful loneliness of being without sorrow or joy. We are mummies who have been denied a face, beings without insight, lost souls in search of redemption. We’ve lost contact with our ancestors, we do not see the future because we’ve lost all notion of the past. First stratum: Trip to Cologne, 2008. Diango and Anne enthusiastically recommend a visit to Kolumba, the Art Museum of the Cologne Archdiocese. More than a trip through time, it means the possibility of articulating two different verb tenses in the same sentence. We talk about language. About foundations. And transmission. I’m struck especially, in the midst of so much beauty and pain, amidst so much perplexity, by a piece by Paul Thek, a suspended table, a coffin, another mummy. I return home. A few months later, the news that the Historical Archive of the City of Cologne has collapsed and with it, documents (some forming part of the foundation of German culture itself), which are lost forever. Teams of archaeologists work amongst the wreckage of this surreal contemporary ruin. What good are archives, anyway? And what is memory but a fragile membrane, a porous eardrum, wrappings marking the body of a mummy. Question mark. Second stratum: Memory / History. LESTORY (LESSONS IN HISTORY) Is, like all of Diango Hernández’s projects, a complex construct comprising different layers of meaning. There is a clear link between archaeology and contemporary art on several levels of depth and understanding, not the least of which is a shared belief in the wisdom of the body and the sensibility of the hands, touch, knowledge through contact, through transmission. Diango Hernández responded to the challenge presented to him by the curator of Arqueológica in the most complex way imaginable, because he doesn’t approach the subject from the point of view of an unearthed archaeological remain, nor does he do it from the comfort of the organization provided by an archive or a reserve, but from the paradigm of the romantic ruin, as a subjective projection. I imagine the installation as a ruin in the future, an archaeological find. A vestige. The work of Diango Hernández is always what is seen and what is not seen. The viewer is offered a trip through space and time; it is a temporal work. It offers a vision of both the future and the past, simultaneously. Like a drawing. At this point we come to understand the reference to Caspar David Friedrich. What point of view should we take? Using the body or using the head? Using memory or forgetfulness? The image is a projection and history a screen. The artist’s installation is a threshold piece that embodies a threshold, a border, and a crossing. In it there are two lines that cross through all of Diango Hernández’s thinking, which I would call the foundations or, to be more precise, a key concern and a foundational feature. The first is education, from the Latin e-ducere, “to lead out”. Education understood as a path, a road in the open, without a predetermined destination. The second is the conviction that nothing can be done without awareness of origin, without working on memory. That link, that connection between concept, action, and consequence, is therefore made functional, shall we say, by drawing. However, drawing here is not understood in any other sense than that of capacity for or competence in creation. Drawing as a field of freedom and individual constitution. Drawing also as the possibility to subvert the order of things or to create dialogue between the lines of history. But, at the same time, drawing as a privileged means of education, as a form of control and tool for the writing of history. It is no coincidence that Diango Hernández refers so often to academic drawing, especially drawing of the human figure. Third (and last) stratum: This unique image, in black and white and on a slightly inclined plane, brings us to the installation in the painting and sculpture hall that the architect Lina Bo Bardi designed in the 60s for ...

Four presidents and In a colonial style at Art Basel Miami with Alexander & Bonin, NY

our Presidents’ and ‘In a Colonial Style’ will be presented in ArtBasel Miami Beach by Alexander and Bonin NY at K06. The sculpture as well as the series of framed paperworks are new works. ‘Four Presidents’ is made out of four desk’s wooden and plastic displays that belonged to a parliament. ‘In a colonial Style’ is a series of pages coming from a German 1940′s book about furniture with ‘colonial style’. ...

Wind Group exhibition "The Castel in the Air" curated by Adam Budak at Centre of Culture ZAMEK, Poznan, Poland

he exhibition “THE CASTLE IN THE AIR. Séance of Imagination” is a subtle projection of a hidden (other) life of the Castle. In this choreography of imagination, the Castle is a phantasmagoria and a mirage: oneiric theatre of a soul, a possible abstraction of a thought and a symbol of a fantasized encounter – outside of a history, beyond time and memory, on a margin of reality and representation. Embraced at twilight, wrapped in a post-heroic, uncomfortable silence, it is an unspoken space of the air, “principal chamber of the confused clepsydra”, shamelessly ornamented by tattoos of the past, folds of destiny, shades of immature pathos. Here and now, the Castle is an imprint in the air, an outline of a faded memory, shaped by the whisper of its rooms and the breath of a delayed inhabitant, a cryptic trace on a wounded skin of once glorious walls. This exhibition invites behind the backstage of a truth and fiction, there, where the immaterial and ephemeral corresponds with the sensual and imagined; where the real and unreal, the present and absent collide in shaping a habitat of the phenomenal, magical and irrational. The Castle acts as a phenomenological frame of fiction and fantasy; a test for a capacity of senses, a medium and an illusion, a haunted place of specters and half-shadows, swirled in their hysterical dances, innocent sun-lights and absent protagonists in a search of a master-narrative and a cancelled spectacle of history; here, the mechanics of wonder and a mystery of a day-dream generate an eurhythmics of ephemerality and enigma –in a roller coaster of  appearance and disappearance, lightness and transparency, delirium of delusion. A cloud, a mist, a veil, a mirror reflection of a blurred silhouette at a distance, a choral music, echoed in an endless corridor – these are the enchanted landscapes of mind and body, sites and props of suspended disbelief and resistance. The artists, invited to this exhibition, consider architecture as a psychological construct and a deranged partner. Their poetic works (woven of image, sound and light) analyze subconscious layers of a historical space and perception. As a labyrinth of lost identity, “THE CASTLE IN THE AIR. Séance of Imagination” constructs a history of an unfulfilled desire and collective hallucination; an ultimate (desperate) attempt at writing a new (re-imagined) history. Artists: Kai Altoff, Francis Alys, Michel Blazy, Ulla Von Brandenburg, Fernando Sanchez Castillo, Thea Djordjadze, Cecilia Edefalk, Tim Eitel, Cerith Wyn Evans, Spencer Finch, Adrian Ghenie, Jos De Gruyter and Harald Thys, Joao Maria Gusmao and Pedro Paiva, Diango Hernández, Ann Veronica Jannsens, Sergej Jensen, Dorota Jurczak, Tomasz Kowalski, Gabriel Kuri, Elad Lassry, Maria Loboda, Ursula Mayer, Simon Dybbroe Møller, Navid Nuur, Susan Philipsz, Josef Strau, Javier Tellez.   image: Wind, Diango Hernández 2012. courtesy of Centre of Culture ZAMEK and the artist “The Castel in the Air” November 22 – December 22, 2012 Centrum Kultury ZAMEK ul. Św. Marcin 80/82 61-809 Poznań +48 61 64 65 276 sekretariat@ckzamek.pl http://www.zamek.poznan.pl ...

Sammlung im Prozess Group exhibition curated by Georg Elben at Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl

ine Sammlung ist das Kernstück eines Museums, sie stellt neben Ausstellungen den bleibenden und identitätsstiftenden Existenzgrund eines Museums dar. Diese These stimmt auch für das Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl, dessen Skulpturensammlung ein sehr spezielles Profil besitzt. Deshalb steht die Bestandsaufnahme der Sammlung des Museums am Anfang einer Reihe von Veränderungen, mit denen der neue Direktor Georg Elben seine Arbeit in Marl aufnimmt. Die neue Ausstellung „Sammlung im Prozess – Neupräsentation und Leihgaben“ soll in den folgenden Monaten als „work-in-progress“ weiter verändert werden. Das Gesicht zu Beginn der neuen Präsentation prägen Leihgaben aus dem Duisburger Lehmbruck Museum sowie private Leihgaben. Vor allem jedoch ist es gekennzeichnet von Künstlern, die mit ihren Werken auf die besondere Atmosphäre der Museumsarchitektur und der Sammlung reagiert haben. Zu jeder der kommenden Ausstellungseröffnungen wird auch die Sammlung weiter verändert. Das Scharnier zwischen Exponaten der eigenen Sammlung und den Gästen, aber auch zur Ausstellungsreihe „Der Raum als Prüfstein“ bildet die Intervention der Düsseldorfer Künstlerin Erika Hock. Für den inneren Glaskasten im Erdgeschoß entwirft Hock eine Präsentationsstruktur, die vordergründig eine ordnende Funktion im Ausstellungsraum zu übernehmen scheint. Einem modularen Regalsystem ähnlich, beherbergt ihre Arbeit zahlreiche Skulpturen und Kleinplastiken, die dem Besucher das gleichzeitige Betrachten der einzelnen Objekte ermöglicht. Der Blick wird, anders als bei klassisch-musealen Präsentationsweisen, die den Besucher meist durch eine Anordnung von Sockeln lenken, auf ein Simultanbild ausgerichtet. Erika Hocks Arbeit versteht sich als eine eigenständige Architektur. Sie folgt dem Konzept eines Pavillons und ist auf ein nomadisches Dasein sowie eine Neubespielung ausgerichtet. In diesem Display werden bedeutende Bestände des Museums, etwa von Rudolf Belling, Max Ernst oder Alberto Giacometti, zusammen mit hochrangigen Leihgaben von Norbert Kricke oder Henri Laurens und Skulpturen junger Künstler wie Diango Hernández, Gert und Uwe Tobias oder Paloma Varga Weisz durch ihre Anordnung und Gegenüberstellung in ein neues Licht gerückt. Die Ausstellungsreihe „Der Raum als Prüfstein“ Diese in den kommenden Monaten kontinuierlich veränderte Neupräsentation der Sammlung stellt die Folie dar, auf die sich die Ausstellungsreihe „Der Raum als Prüfstein“ im Projektraum im Untergeschoss bezieht. Die spezifischen architektonischen Bedingungen eines Raumes – hier der einzige weitgehend geschlossene Ausstellungsraum im Untergeschoß des Skulpturenmuseums Glaskasten Marl – wird zum Prüfstein, auf dessen dominante Vorgaben installativ arbeitende Künstler reagieren müssen. Die Reihe von (vorerst) vier Ausstellungen reicht von dem im vergangenen Jahr verstorbenen Stahlbildhauer Ansgar Nierhoff über Diango Hernández im Dezember 2011 bis hin zum Düsseldorfer Manuel Graf im kommenden Frühjahr. Der Ausstellungsort ist ein hermetisch wirkender, langgestreckter Raum mit vertikalen Gliederungen und ausschließlich künstlichem Licht. Diese Bedingungen sind für alle beteiligten Künstler gleich. Sie ermöglichen sowohl eine Profilierung junger als auch eine kritische Bestandsaufnahme etablierter Positionen. Die Ausstellungen werden durch eine relativ kurze Laufzeit und nach Möglichkeit von einem kleinen Katalog begleitet unmittelbar miteinander in Beziehung gesetzt. Die Künstler werden für diese räumliche Situation neue Arbeiten entwickeln, welche auf die architektonischen Gegebenheiten, aber auch auf die spezifische Ausrichtung des Skulpturenmuseums eingehen. Ansgar Nierhoff ist dem Museum seit 1986 verbunden, denn seit diesem Jahr steht eine Skulptur hinter dem Museum am Eduard-Weitsch-Weg. Die Ausstellung des Künstlers ist insofern eine Ausnahme, da sie eine seiner älteren Werkgruppen zeigt. Das Museum hängt diese bislang selten gezeigten „Eisenzeichnungen“. Trotz der Schwere des Materials und der gewaltigen Kraft, mit der es bearbeitet wird, erzielt Nierhoff eine erstaunlich leichte und spontane Wirkung. Zusammen mit den sieben freiformgeschmiedeten „Streckungen“ und einer spielerischen „Bündelung“ erschließt sich auf nur 80 Quadratmetern die ganze künstlerische Bandbreite des Kölner Bildhauers.   Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl Creiler Platz, Rathaus 45768 Marl skulpturenmuseum@marl.de + 49 (0)2365 / 99 22 57 ...

Interrogating Marcel Group exhibition "Fronteras en mutación, en tránsito" of Bridges & Borders (fase III) at CCEBA, Centro Cultural de España en Buenos Aires

ometimes I think about Marcel and I remember him telling me: ‘The visitor is an invisible being, a volatile element and therefore the visitor is by principle uncontrollable’ With vehemence Marcel would continue: ‘If you would know my plan, maybe you would understand that a single space can only be occupied by a single idea’. Yet to all my efforts towards defining a new type of visitor, I failed to convince Marcel. My thoughts were too out of focus and my arguments were too redundant. Marcel’s ideas occupy a very defined place in my memory: maybe a space that is also occupied by all the things that I would like to change. A conversation with Marcel wasn’t ever enough, but neither an interview could ever allow me to know exactly about his master plan: the plan that I thought he was meticulously designing, a fictional plan that consumed every single cell of my existence. It was hard for me to believe that an interrogation could eventually work, I was thinking about this possibility for months until I decided to finally interrogate him. Honestly, this was my last remaining desperate attempt, now it was clear to me that Marcel would be at least temporarily guilty and I would remain eternally as the mediocre. I didn’t really care: better to live as a mediocre than to died without knowing Marcel’s plan. My first problem was to select the interrogatory space: I knew well that Marcel hated symmetrical spaces without windows; nevertheless I was determined to design a clinical space. I wanted to build an absolute space where walls would not only define a perfect form, but also control precisely Marcel’s mind. My second and most complex problem was about myself: How do I become an interrogator? Marcel and I knew each other since we were kids and even though during the last years we were more and more distant from one-another, we still had a fundamental connection. Before staging the interrogation I decided that I must find a way to get out of my body. Hypothetically speaking, if this could have been possible, I could have also entered Marcel’s body and the cross-examination would have been unnecessary. All my propositions, like the one just described, were failures. The interrogation nevertheless did take place. On the 25th of March 1927 in the city of Paris I went to the police office located in the neighborhood of Villette and in complicity with the Captain Caspar D. I accused Marcel with the crime of murder. The following days a series of disastrous events took place, which for the rest of my life, I came to fear. Captain Caspar D – after constructing the details of Marcel’s case and subsequent to his interrogation – was stabbed in a narrow street in the south of Paris. Marcel now was guilty of murdering Mademoiselle Maret an eighteen years-old young Parisian and I would have to live without knowing ever the outcome of Marcel’s interrogation. In one of Marcel’s last letters from jail he wrote to me: Dear Andre yesterday I was remembering with pleasure one of ours conversations about the relevance of the space. During these years as you can imagine the miserly walls have isolated me from everything and from everybody; leaving me alone all to myself. Yet when I consult my memories and I try hard do not repeat them, I confess to you in this short letter, that there is one memory that insists on being remembered everyday. It would be impolite from my side to not describe it to you but as you might understand memories cannot be written; because once a memory is written it becomes a plan. Diango Hernández, Düsseldorf 15/04/2011, (Edited by Jade Niklai) ...