Groups

Made in Germany Group exhibition curated by Martin Engler at Kunstverein Hanover

iango Hernández’s oeuvre is both political and poetical. His materials are found and secondhand antennas, telegraph poles, plastic chairs, the Internet, the political situation in his home country Cuba, or sculptural, acoustic arrangements of record players and loudspeakers. His oeuvre is doubtlessly rooted in the Cuba of the nineteen-nineties after the demise of the Soviet Union and the accompanying breakdown of the nationalized Cuban economy. The artists of the Gabinete Ordo Amoris, which he co-founded, created objects and installations revealing the permanent scarcity of all essential commodities as both creative potential and scandalous poverty. Hernández continues to be concerned with documentary arrangements which create parallel worlds through fiction and narration, abstraction and realism and which, in spite of their social involvement, preserve a specific melancholic beauty. Arising out of this latently illegal context between art and political demands are Hernández’s drawings, which up to today serve as the basis for his artistic work. His ironical-poetical collages derived from communism and everyday life join a collective past and private mythologies into large-scale installations which respond in like measure to the respective exhibition site and the artist’s own aesthetic cosmos.   Catalogue: This comprehensive overview of current contemporary German art surveys the latest developments in a country not only reunified, east and west, but one with Europe. In recent years, more and more foreign artists have chosen to live and work in Germany. This volume offers a snapshot of their increasingly interdependent ecosystem, where national tradition mingles with cultural exchange. The book doesn’t group its 50 featured subjects by region of origin–half are from some kind of international background–or even necessarily by their current homes: it tracks the places where their works have been created, treating artistic production as an outcome of living and working together. Its subjects include a few of the most promising newcomers around, including Candice Breitz, Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset, Sabine Hornig, Bjørn Melhus, Jonathan Monk, Diango Hernández, Julian Rosefeldt, Florian Slotawa, Simon Starling and Amelie von Wulffen. ISBN: 9783775719858, FORMAT: Paperback, 9 x 10.5 in. / 360 pgs / 200 color, PUBLISHER: Hatje Cantz ...

Inside the mouth of the panther Group exhibition at "The Unhomely: Phantom Scenes in a Global Society" curated by Okwui Enwezor at 2nd Seville Biennial, Seville, Spain

nlike most of the Cuban artist who have risen to international prominence in the last decades, Diango Hernández is a graduate of Havana’s Superior Institute of Design (ISDI) and not of its Institute of Art (ISA). But it is precisely his training in design that proved to be crucial in infiltrating an art system predicated upon the production and dissemination of objects which, taking Duchamp’s ready-mades as the ultimate justification of artistic license, have often relied upon little more than good design to be recognized as valuable. As the founding member of the artists collective Gabinete Ordo Amoris (1995-2003) Hernández was concerned not with the market value inherent to art objects but with that conferred upon everyday objects which come into existence in the absence of a market economy to support the industrial creation of even the most basic goods. A mix of Augustinian philosophy (Ordo Amoris) and of Dada-inflected collector craze (as in Cabinet de curiosités), both reflected in its name, Gabinete Ordo Amoris revealed its true aim as an anthropo-social investigation of contemporary Cubanidad by making it its signature practice to display collections of hand-made objects that emerged as part of the provisional culture of the country’s ‘special period.’ After dissolving the collective in 2003, Hernández diverted his working methodology from a museography of the present into an archeology of the future by mixing found objects with objects of his creation into assemblages of which the use has yet to be devised; or into environments that have somewhat of a surreal atmosphere. Bebe de Mis Rosas (2006) while displaying the signs of reassuring domesticity (the chimney, the desk, the lamp), upset the feelings of comfort that such environments usually arise by juxtaposing uncanny images like that of a bleeding rose. The dysfunctionality of the scene makes for a quiet critique of the realm of objecthood into which most. Robert Franklin Williams (February 26, 1925-October 15, 1996) was a civil rights leader, author, and the president of the Monroe, North Carolina NAACP chapter in the 1950s and early 1960s. At a time when racial tension was high and official abuses were rampant, Williams was a key figure in the American South and organized armed resistance against white supremacy. In 1961 Robert F. Williams found his way to Cuba, where he regularly made radio addresses to Southern blacks on “Radio Free Dixie”, a station he established with assistance from Cuban President Fidel Castro. Though the station’s signal was aggressively blocked by the US Government, it was for a time widely known among black Americans as a voice against oppression around the country. During this stay, together with his wife, he published the newspaper, The Crusader. It was also here that he wrote Negroes With Guns, which had a significant influence on Black Panthers founder Huey P. Newton. The Cuban poster printed in the late 60’s RETALIATION TO CRIME: REVOLUTIONARY VIOLENCE signed as (OSPAAAL¹ N.D. Offset 22″ x 13″) It has a lot to do with this relationship in between Cuban government and its support to different Afro- American organizations at that time and closely it has more to do with the relationship of Robert F. Williams and Fidel Castro. The series of 30 drawings conforming “Inside the mouth of the panther” is a hand made reproduction of this poster’s motive where the inside of the panther mouth becomes a sort of deformed abstraction. Each one of the drawings is showing outside the mouth of the panther a small almost invisible hand written phrase that goes from Article No.1 Power to Article No.30 Power. These phrases make reference to each one article of the International Human Rights Declaration. The Cuban support specially during 60’s and 70’s to all of the liberation movement around the world is not a secret by now, exiling a figure like Robert F. Williams is just one of the cases of “fighters for the freedom” that were exiled in Cuba. With “Inside the mouth of the panther” I just want to make the following commentary: Why the Cuban government have been not able to accept the “fighters of the freedom” that their own system have created? Then the mouth of the panther and all of the loud screams of it have become an abstraction.   1. The Organization of Solidarity with the People of Asia, Africa and Latin America (Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina), abbreviated as OSPAAAL, is a Cuban political movement with the stated purpose of fighting globalisation, imperialism, neoliberalism and defending human rights. It publishes the magazine Tricontinental. The OSPAAAL was founded in Havana in January 1966, after the Tricontinental Conference, a meeting of leftist delegates from Guinea, the Congo, South Africa, Angola, Vietnam, Syria, North Korea, the Palestinian Liberation Organisation, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Chile and the Dominican Republic. Mehdi Ben Barka, the Moroccan leader of the Tricontinental, was murdered the year before, allegedly with complicity of the CIA. Catalogue: BIACS: The Unhomely – 2nd International Biennial of Contemporary Art of Seville. Paperback: 336 pages, Publisher: Actar (Oct 2006), Language English, ISBN-10: 9788493487935, ISBN-13:, 978-8493487935, ASIN: 8493487937, 23.6 x 16.8 x 2.8 cm ...

Cris(is)Home Group exhibition "Zones of Contact" curated by Charles Merewether at Biennial of Sydney

hat it was ours It’s still ours, but now the ruined F is my home. Whether an improvised wall a corner of a house or the half of a box can be associated to the appearing of “Cris(is)Home” and it’s constructed out of an old and ruined fragment of industry’s roof. This “object” shows two faces, one it’s the outside of a roof, made out of corrugated metal, two chimneys and a light window and its second face it’s the inside of the roof that shows its inner structure and it has hanging on it an improvised screen on which will be projected a video called “Emilya and the pike”. “Emilya and the pike” is a Russian folktale and tells the story of how a lazy and foolish guy became king using the will of a charmed fish. The video is made by fifty images that were used in Cuban schools during the 60’S, 70’s and still in the 80’s to teach the history of communism and each one of these slides came originally with a text explaining the slide itself and talking about how good and glorious was the process of building the communism and how brave were its leaders. These texts are now in the video substituted by the folktale’s text where the main character of the tale (Emilya) it is now played by Vladimir I. Lenin. The sequence of images is accompanied with “Rapsodia Cubana” a music piece composed by Ernesto Lecuona in 1955 and performed by the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Michael Bartos. The sustained economical and political crisis that started in the early 90’s in Cuba has brought to the ordinary individual the urgency of surviving, the everyday life became a battle field where people struggled hard in every corner to get what they need for living, everybody was using what it was already a ruin or any forgotten fragment to build something useful out of it. All the promised economical development of the Revolution collapsed, the industrial aims achieved in the 80’s thanks to the contribution of the Socialist countries from the east were fading out fast and in the turn of two years the scenario was again without hope, like it use to be for us a century ago, without allies and with many enemies, the biggest: The Soviet phantom. The official construction of a new style of life was already established in the 90’s, style of life that was baptized by the government as “Período Especial en Tiempo de Guerra” (Special period for war times) this was an extreme period where the government wouldn’t support anymore the basic needs of the population as they where doing it before, I am talking around mid 90’s, by that time there was a popular voice saying every day “hay que luchar” (we have to fight) what it means we have now to figure out our life by our owns and to wait for a new and official definition of future. Cris(is)Home explore the surviving of the individual freedom in certain kinds of political crisis and present the education as a process of indoctrination where the only cure we can have against it are our personal fantasies and to use their power to transform (for instance) the history in a big toy.   Catalogue: A full colour catalogue of 304 pages provides a comprehensive overview of the exhibition, its artists, and the ideas that informed it. The publication features an extensive essay by Charles Merewether and eight specially commissioned texts by leading writers from around the world: Jack Persekian, Branislav Dimitrijevic, Viktor Misiano, Hou Hanru, Chaitanya Sambrani, Peter Osborne, Natasa Petresin, and Rasha Saiti. Also included are commissioned texts by 85 international writer on each of the participating artists. ...

Stop Motherfuckers Group exhibition at "Lichtkunst aus Kunstlicht" curated by Gregor Jansen at ZKM Museum für Neue Kunst, Karlsruhe

everal car’s tail lights switched on laying down over the floor in a museum room, they are just pieces of a bigger system but the system is absent, they look like a ruins of a night traffic jam, they can’t move but still they can work as they used to. The red tail-lights are the warning signs in our daily life, telling us that we have to stop otherwise we’ll crash. The western society economical and technological development had brought the underdevelopment of the collective conscience and as a consequence the cynicism about global issues, Tail lights (Stop mother fuckers) is saying one more time stop to all the things we all know have to be stopped and at the same time is using the “art eco” to multiply this voice. The red tail-lights on are a powerful sign, they already had created a warning automatism inside us; I want to present this automatism as a conscience possibility, as a fact that confirm that still we can stop even when we are apart.   Catalogue: Lichtkunst aus Kunstlicht. Light art from artificial light, Pages: 700 Seiten, Publisher: Hatje Cantz Verlag; Auflage: Bilingual (1. March 2006), Language: Deutsch, ISBN-10: 3775717749, 28,4 x 22 x 5,2 cm ...

Palabras Group exhibition "Always a little Further" curated by Rosa Martínez at Arsenale, 51. Venice Biennial

“Palabras” by Anke Kempkes n the 1990s Diango Hernández was prodrucing an extended series of drawings which processed the political and economical crisis of Cuba after the colapse of the socialist systems in East-Europe. ‘I was acting artistically out of a collective consciousness. Havana was a backdrop, a big landscape of mistakes.’ The installation Palabras is a three-dimensional materialisation of this special drawing activity reflecting on a political constellation – the dramatic, everlasting conflict between Cuba and the United States – in the construction of a ruin, an allegorical site, shifting between a range of factual experience and images of desire and mutual projections. The almost mythical dimension of the conflict of opposite systems, – both deeply conservative in the very sense of the notion – , is inflected with a sense of melancholy and nostalgia, while it was and is still producing highly destructive and brutal effects on humans beings. Palabras materializes this state of destruction of past and present, belonging to the collective perception of the every-day in Cuba, a sedimentation of to political into the minds of people: ‘Palabras is a scenario, an abandoned construction site, ruins of a long process of longing and of tropical trance, but also Palabras is a fact proving another way of construction. The political demagogy has destroyed a city, but it as well has constructed a country, it formed.’ In the foreground of the installation some primitive electricity poles are arranged in way which transports a sense of out-datedness. Due to neglect or destruction they became dysfunctional. The poles are reminiscent of the praise of communication technology in communist propaganda and at the same time contrasting the standards of technology in the US today, the big machinery of high-end communication and entertainment industry, forming the modern form of mass propaganda. ‘Electrification was the most important strategic-economical plan in Lenin’s agenda for all socialist countries, especially the ones called underdeveloped…, electricity had an important function: to bring technology and also the industry of propaganda and indoctrination to the most distant places… .’ A video-projection and a recorded sound-choreography are collaged into the reality effect of the staged objects, the abandoned site of the poles. The three levels of sound, objects scattered on the floor and the slowly fading images on the wall, turn the whole scenery into a moment of political trance: There is a sound track mixing the anthems of Cuba and US-America, a track called ‘Pentagon’ performed by Gonzalo Rubalcaba, as well as telephone conversation between President Nixon and Henry Kissinger on the Watergate affaire. The projection is a subtle montage of politically highly charged images, calling to mind the complex relationship between Cuba and the States in the course of the 20th century: there are two images of the monument to the Maine victims (‘A Las Victimas del MAINE’) which was inaugurated in 1925 and dedicated to the victims of the American naval vessel in the time of the Spanish-American conflict over Cuba’s fight for independence at the end of the 19th century. The first image shows the monument in the time when it was still considered as a symbol for the American presence in Cuba. The second photo shows the monument in its today shape with the Eagle demounted from it as a symbol of Cuba’s independence. Another image shows the massive Jose Marti-monument on Revolution Square in Havana from 1959. It is a highest point in the capital and the strongest icon of Cuban revolution. Next to the Cuban imagery we are suddenly confronted with a satellite photo from 1962, which was used as a proof of the presence of Soviet nuclear missiles on Cuba. Again an image of the same year, – but from a seemingly very different sphere -, appears, showing Rudolf Nureyev in an stunning ballet performance of ‘Le Corsaire’. The course of the intense documentary is interrupted by an image of red roses. Their beauty has an acidly romantic presence and can not be related to the rest of the concept right away although there is something very disturbing to them. And indeed the roses become here a sinister symbol of American political trauma: After her husbands murder Jacqueline Kennedy stated: ‘Three times a day in Texas we were greeted with bouquets of the yellow roses of Texas. Only in Dallas they gave me red roses. I remember thinking: How funny … red roses for me.’ The video ends with a ‘trailer’ in which a list of the socialist countries presidents and prime ministers scrolls down to the song ‘E penso a te’ performed by Mina. ...

doku/fiction Mouse on Mars – reviewed & remixed Group exhibition curated by Peter Gorschlüter at Kunsthalle Düsseldorf

ie kaum eine andere Band ist Mouse on Mars bekannt für die genreübergreifende Faszination ihrer Produktionen, in denen Pop, Club, A-Musik und neumusikalische Konzepte scheinbar mühelos zusammenfließen. Die beiden Musiker Jan St.Werner und Andi Toma, die 1994 ihr gemeinsames Projekt Mouse on Mars tauften und ihre Musik in dem selbstgebauten Tonstudio in Düsseldorf produzieren, verschreiben sich dabei einer geheimnisvollen Methode namens „phantastische Analyse”. Ausgehend von der Idee, ein Remix-Album der Musik von Mouse on Mars als gedruckten Sammelband zu veröffentlichen, haben Jan St.Werner und Andi Toma gemeinsam mit der Kunsthalle Düsseldorf über 30 Künstler und Wissenschaftler zu ihren Vorstellungen und Bezügen zu Mouse on Mars befragt. Sie wurden eingeladen, mit Mouse on Mars in Dialog zu treten und Beiträge für das Projekt zu entwickeln, ohne dabei Sound zu generieren. Angeregt durch die Musik von Mouse on Mars, die eher „work in progress” ist, als daß sie Abgeschlossenheit anstrebt, entstanden Ideen, Entwürfe und Werke, die einhergehen mit einer phantastischen, manchmal formalen, stets aber persönlichen Interpretation musikalischen Erlebens. Die Ausstellung präsentiert Installationen, Gemälde, Videos, Fotografien, Zeichnungen und Skulpturen. Zwischen Dokumentation und Fiktion, Fakten und Narration werden künstlerische Ansätze und Produktionsverfahren, theoretische Reflexionen und phantastische Interpretationen, die zahlreiche Verweise auf die Musik von Mouse on Mars beinhalten, einander gegenübergestellt. Dabei erschließen sich vielgestaltige Erzähl- und Ideenräume.   Mit Beiträgen von Heike Baranowsky, Rosa Barba, Laurent Baudoux, Armin Boehm, Michel Carré, Katja Davar, Jan De Cock, Diango Hernández, Waseem Khan, Matthias Köchling, Dirk Königsfeld, Stefan Kozalla, Simon Lewis, Jean-François Moriceau & Petra Mrzyk, Soulis Moustakidis, Daniel Roth, Constantin Rothkopf, Silke Schatz, Christian Schwarzwald, Alice Stepanek/Steven Maslin, Leif Trenkler, Emmett Williams, Jo Zimmermann. Die Ausstellung wird begleitet von einem umfangreichen Rahmenprogramm mit Beiträgen von Dietmar Dath, Frank Dommert, F.X.Randomiz, Olaf Karnik, Mouse on Mars, Schlammpeitziger, Johannes Ullmaier, Vert, Oswald Wiener uvm. Peter Gorschlüter (Kunsthalle Düsseldorf), Jan St.Werner/Andi Toma (Mouse on MarsUsing Mouse on Mars’ songs, albums and concerts as inspiration, 37 artists, musicians, designers and academics have created commentaries, paintings, drawings and collages for this book. The results gathered here document the visual, artistic and theoretical contexts of modern electronic music as well as a range of personal interpretations of what it’s like to experience it. The book contains essays by author and journalist Dietmar Dath as well as Professor Siegfried Zielinski of the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne in addition to an interview of linguist and cyberneticist Oswald Wiener by Jan St. Werner. As an added bonus, the book includes an audio CD featuring an exclusive Mouse on Mars track. The concept for an accompanying exhibition was born out of the book project. It will be held at the German museum Kunsthalle Duesseldorf from April 4 through June 27, 2004. A press conference will take place on April 2 at 11 AM with the official opening on April 3 at 8 PM. For more information on this exhibition, please see . Peter Gorschlüter, Jan St. Werner, Andi Toma   Catalogue: Editors – Kunsthalle Düsseldorf Release Date: April 2004 Format: 16.8 x 24 cm Features: 160 Pages, Softcover, incl. CD with exclusive audio track Language: bilingual German/English ISBN: 978-3-89955-035-1 ...