Born in Cuba in 1970, Hernández moved to Europe in 2003 and currently lives and works between Havana and Düsseldorf

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“I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Group exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary, London

I never thought I’d see you again. Where have you been until now? Well how are you? how have you been? It’s a long time since we last met. Roxy Music, “Chance Meeting” “ never thought I’d see you again” is not exactly about history painting. Neither obliged to any style, nor explicitly referential to particular precedents, the exhibition begins with the premise that painting, more than any medium, is always driven by its own genres. Painting is persistent in the history of art precisely because of the specificity of the styles and idioms it adopts or quotes. Even if contemporary painting is underpinned by a conceptual framework, it is almost impossible to avoid some reference to that almost infinite list of established modes – landscape, portrait, still life, formalist, expressionist, to name a few. But rather than painting being a reiteration of its past, the recognition of, and resistance to, these conventions makes it a site of constant renewal. No longer bound to such polarities as figuration or abstraction, contemporary practice takes the idea of painting as a given. It co-opts genres without hierarchy or priority, and as a type of shorthand or economy of expression. That is to say, we recognise something in the ‘style’ of the painting. We speak its language, because many of the conventions of painting are all around us in the visual information we negotiate every day. We recognise the conventions, from perspective to painterly gesture, even if those conventions are put to work for different purposes. And it is less about what an image in the painting might convey, than the means through which that image or gesture is achieved. The exhibition does not try to find a unified style for painting today, but recognises that there are modes in which the painter may operate, perhaps without long-term commitment, but also without irony. Painting is never without reference, context or precedent. It always carries with it many memories and legacies and at the same time appears thoroughly regenerated. “I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Mike Bouchet and Paul McCarthy, Jason Brooks, Agnieska Brzeżańska, Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, Pamela Golden, Diango Hernández, Natelle Jubelin, Koen van den Broek, Ian Whittlesea 21 January – 27 February 2015 Private View: 20 January 2015 ...

The space between private and public property Benefiz Auktion. Saturday 6 December 2014, 7—9 PM. NAK, Aachen, Germany

Opens: Saturday 6 December 2014, 7—9 PM Runs: 7 December—21 December 2014 NAK Neuer Aachener Kunstverein Passstraße 29, 52070 Aachen Tel. +49 (0) 241-503255 Fax +49 (0) 241-536848 info@neueraachenerkunstverein.de www.neueraachenerkunstverein.de “The space between private and public property” Diango Hernández 2014 18 x 18 x 16 cm Two original Cuban license plates (the yellow is for private cars and the blue is for public/state cars) “Dictator’s finger” Diango Hernández 2014 9.5 x 10 x 6 cm Bronze casted finger and plastic ...

Commemorating Hurricanes Salon 2014 / 2015 Jahresgaben-Ausstellung, Kunstverein Nürnberg, Germany

Diango Hernández (*1970, Sancti Spìritus, Kuba; lebt in Düsseldorf) hat im Kunstverein Nürnberg dieses Jahr die Einzelausstellung „In hazard, translated“ präsentiert. In dieser hat er skulpturale Assemblagen ausgelegt, die sich mit einer vielschichtigen Lesbarkeit von Geschichte beschäftigen. Ausgehend von dem historischen Ereignis eines Hurrikans, der 1932 die Südostküste Kubas zerstört hat, entwickelte er eigene bildliche Übersetzungen, um einen differenzierten Blick auf die gegenwärtige Situation in seinem Heimatland sowie in Europa zu ...

Entorno Crítico Group exhibition at CAB de Burgos with Diango Hernández

Juicio al presente en el CAB El Foro de la Cultura orquesta ‘Entorno crítico’, con obras de la colecciones CaixaBank-Caja de Burgos y Musac que abordan la realidad desde varios prismas por A.S.R. 10/10/2014 os caminos del Centro de Arte Caja de Burgos (CAB) y del Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (Musac) se vuelven a cruzar, y sin posibilidad de escapatoria, por obra y gracia del I Foro de la Cultura. Entorno crítico. El presente en un brete en las colecciones Caja de Burgos-CaixaBank-MUSAC selecciona a veinticuatro artistas que cuestionan la realidad, que la abordan desde la poesía, que buscan respuestas, que conjuran la naturaleza, que meten el dedo en sus llagas, que plantean, proponen y dudan, que se solidarizan, que saben reír y llorar… Eva Lootz , Do Ho Suh, Geert Goiris, Narda Alvarado, Iván Navarro, Gabriel Kondratiuk, Allan Sekula, Javier Gutiérrez Orrico, Marjk Bijl, Marcel van Eden, Mateo Maté, Eulalia Valldosera, Cao Guimaraes, Corinna Schint, Diango Hernández, Lara Almarcegui, Sven Pahlson, Meiro Koizumi, Simeón Saiz, Gregorio Méndez, Pors & Rao, Jors Laarman, Francesco Jodice y Marjetica Potrc sientan al presente en el banquillo y lo interrogan, lo abordan desde distintos prismas y vuelcan las conclusiones en sus obras. No dictan sentencia. Eso se lo dejan al espectador. Hablan del conflicto emocional de los inmigrantes, sopesan el valor del progreso como motor de la historia, denuncian los desmanes urbanísticos y los políticos, se cuelan en la mente del individuo para bucear en sus contradicciones, reflejan dispares realidades sociales… «Vivimos tiempos de cambio, de transformaciones, de incertidumbres. El mundo que heredamos cuando en 2005 se inauguró el Musac era conflictivo y diez años después no deja de ser más inseguro. El arte tiene muchas funciones y una de ellas es documentar qué ocurre a nuestro alrededor. Las instituciones, los artistas y las obras respiran el aire de problemas en que vivimos y este aire se condensa en esta muestra», ilustra el director del Musac, Manuel Olveira, que entre estos nubarrones también ve un rayo de sol: «Todo tiene arreglo y salida y parte de ella está en el arte, que es un vector de transformación y generación social, un espacio en el que podemos encontrar horizontes de todo tipo». Su colega del CAB, Emilio Navarro, observa que ha descubierto que hay ideas que se repiten como las falsas apariencias y la capacidad imaginativa y creativa del ser humano para resistir en territorios hostiles tanto urbanos como naturales… Y ahí está el arte. source: El correo de Burgos 10/10/2014 ...

Thank you Mr. Fukuyama but we don’t want to go there In response to Mr. Francis Fukuyama's speech at Metamodernism - The return of History

“I am circling around God, around the ancient tower, and I have been circling for a thousand years, and I still don’t know if I am a falcon, or a storm, or a great song.” Rainer Maria Rilke. The book of hours, 1899-1903 n that white and very well proportionated auditorium the audience was whispering, it sounded like a small river, in fact we were surrounded by water but certainly we were not on an island. A group of maybe 100 people attended to an entire day of conferences, panels and discussions organized by Notes on Metamodernism (Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker) in cooperation with the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. It is maybe the most difficult of all tasks to start something that you don’t quite know yet what it is. With this sense of vagueness and with total absence of big headlines Robin van den Akker and Timotheus Vermeulen began the introduction of “Metamodernism – The end of history”. While trying to explain Metamodernism Vermeulen said …we don’t have a manifesto and furthermore at the moment we can’t accurately define what Metamodernism is because until now most of our observations are based on (a) sensitivity… After this sentence I immediately realized how refreshingly lost we were and most importantly I noticed that finding a destination wasn’t part of their agenda at all. That intelligent form of disorientation made me feel very comfortable and gently took away from the day the pressure that formal welcomes carry. The first speaker of the day was Francis Fukuyama, the well-known American political scientist and author of The End of History and the Last Man (1992). Everybody was looking forward to hear Mr. Fukuyama’s speech; I was careful with my excitement but very curious to hear the voice of an authentic modernist. Surprisingly Mr. Fukuyama started his speech saying that Nigeria wants to be like Denmark and consequently explained why Nigeria can’t be like Denmark. Using a great set of storytelling skills he told us the anecdote of how a German trading company operating in Nigeria got shut-down because the reigning corruption of the Nigerian state. Mr. Fukuyama explained in a very elegant fashion how the lack of institutions in developing countries obstructs the implementation of the modern capitalist system and subsequently this causes impoverishment, corruption and violence in these countries. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing and started feeling uncomfortable when seconds later a catatonic feeling invaded me and while I was still able to see Mr. Fukuyama, his voice started fading away until I wasn’t able to hear anything. Suddenly I was seated in a café in Abuja the capital of Nigeria having tea with Mr. Fukuyama. “Diango you were telling me something about this Cuban Taíno Cacique (chief), right?” Yes Mr. Fukuyama, his name was Hatuey and he was the first to rebel against the invading Spaniards -actually he is considered the first fighter against colonialism in the New World- to make it short he was caught in 1512 and convicted to death by burning. In the moment when he was already tied to the stake a Spanish priest asked him if he would accept Jesus and go to heaven. Hatuey, thinking a little, asked the religious man if Spaniards went to heaven. The religious man answered yes… Hatuey then said without further thought: Thank you Mr. priest but I don’t want to go there. Bartolomé de Las Casas the 16th-century Spanish historian attributed the following speech to Hatuey -sorry Mr. Fukuyama but I have to Google this one- OK here it is: Hatuey showing the Taínos of Caobana a basket of gold and jewels, said: Here is the God the Spaniards worship. For these they fight and kill; for these they persecute us and that is why we have to throw them into the sea… They tell us, these tyrants, that they adore a God of peace and equality, and yet they usurp our land and make us their slaves. They speak to us of an immortal soul and of their eternal rewards and punishments, and yet they rob our belongings, seduce our women, violate our daughters. Incapable of matching us in valour, these cowards cover themselves with iron that our weapons cannot break…(1) I started having the feeling that I was running out of time but before going back to Amsterdam I had to tell him one more thing. Mr. Fukuyama I have seen sculptures on fire and frozen paintings, I have lived the life of an artist and I am exhausted of dreaming, I have the right to be lazy and I want back what you or someone like you took away from Hatuey, an existence without work. Art is the biggest achievement of peace and history is the worst painting ever painted. (1) Bartolomé de Las Casas, “Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies”. Translated by Nigel Griffin. (London: Penguin, 1999) ISBN 0-14-044562-5. *This text has been written after lonelyfingers (Anne Pöhlmann and Diango Hernández) attended to “Metamodernism – The return of History”. Stedelijk Museum ...

Diango Hernández in an interview with Gerhard Obermüller for "Socialist Nature", book published by DISTANZ

Gerhard Obermüller: In your art you often confront us with historical upheavals. These upheavals are omnipresent and leave behind traces even after events seemed to have passed over them. For you these traces specifically include processes of memory, overwriting, but also official omissions in the process of memory. Socialist Nature here in Linz is your latest experimental artistic set-up with which you set out to remodulate processes of ...

Socialist Nature or the utopia of the ordinary by Gerhard Obermüller for "Socialist Nature", book published by DISTANZ

Hernández circulates the concept of nature in a much more ambiguous manner in this exhibition, however. The ambivalence of socialism’s handling of nature and the environment has been a topic of concern for Diango Hernández for some time. Even if there may well have been more destruction of nature under capitalism than in many communist countries, the artist sees a fundamental difference in how people reflect on this ...

Spiritual Discovery by Timotheus Vermeulen for "Socialist Nature"

The thought experiment Hernández has initiated here, one that I have tried to develop further here, is to think of what nature produced by ideology performs other than that ideology. He sets out on a journey to discover all the subplots that have been activated that run against or parallel to or divert from ideology—all the subplots, that is, that unexpectedly and effectively express ...