Texts

Diango Hernández Explores Cuban National Identity at Marlborough Contemporary Rachel Will for BLOUINARTINFO, UK

ondon’s Marlborough Contemporary is currently hosting an exhibition featuring original works by Cuban artist Diango Hernández, in which he explores his national identity through painting and sculpture. The three-part exhibition titled “The Book of Waves” consists of new artworks that examine the challenging external perceptions of Cuba along with internal perceptions. The first part of the exhibition, from which the show is named, consists of multicolored waves that are actually an alphabetic font corresponding to Fidel Castro’s revolutionary 1961 speech “Words to Intellectuals.” Notably, Hernández’s font characters look the same, meaning that the figurative text and the artwork translate into repetitive waves that can only be interpreted in painterly terms. The second portion contains fruit sculptures with lemons painted with abstract international maritime signal flags. The use of fruit is symbolic of American imperialism enacted through the United Fruit Company’s long-lasting impact on the Cuban economy. The final work called “Sunsets” comprises a sequence of watercolors on the pages of a first edition Guerilla Warfare handbook by Ernesto “Che” Guevara. On display will be a landscape drawing on tracing paper affixed directly to the gallery wall based on an illustration from the same manuscript. Hernández argues that the theme of national identity unifies all Cuban artists, even those in who have left. And, since leaving the island nation, the Düsseldorf-based artist has been actively absorbed with Cuba by exploring means that socialist philosophy denies or promotes an aesthetic or spiritual experience. BLOUINARTINFO, UK The Book of Waves continues at Marlbrough Contemporary until 5 June 2015. Marlborough Contemporary 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY +44 (0)20 7629 5161 marlboroughcontemporary.com photo: Francis Ware   ...

Thank you Mr. Fukuyama but we don’t want to go there In response to Mr. Francis Fukuyama's speech at Metamodernism - The return of History

“I am circling around God, around the ancient tower, and I have been circling for a thousand years, and I still don’t know if I am a falcon, or a storm, or a great song.” Rainer Maria Rilke. The book of hours, 1899-1903 n that white and very well proportionated auditorium the audience was whispering, it sounded like a small river, in fact we were surrounded by water but certainly we were not on an island. A group of maybe 100 people attended to an entire day of conferences, panels and discussions organized by Notes on Metamodernism (Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker) in cooperation with the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. It is maybe the most difficult of all tasks to start something that you don’t quite know yet what it is. With this sense of vagueness and with total absence of big headlines Robin van den Akker and Timotheus Vermeulen began the introduction of “Metamodernism – The end of history”. While trying to explain Metamodernism Vermeulen said …we don’t have a manifesto and furthermore at the moment we can’t accurately define what Metamodernism is because until now most of our observations are based on (a) sensitivity… After this sentence I immediately realized how refreshingly lost we were and most importantly I noticed that finding a destination wasn’t part of their agenda at all. That intelligent form of disorientation made me feel very comfortable and gently took away from the day the pressure that formal welcomes carry. The first speaker of the day was Francis Fukuyama, the well-known American political scientist and author of The End of History and the Last Man (1992). Everybody was looking forward to hear Mr. Fukuyama’s speech; I was careful with my excitement but very curious to hear the voice of an authentic modernist. Surprisingly Mr. Fukuyama started his speech saying that Nigeria wants to be like Denmark and consequently explained why Nigeria can’t be like Denmark. Using a great set of storytelling skills he told us the anecdote of how a German trading company operating in Nigeria got shut-down because the reigning corruption of the Nigerian state. Mr. Fukuyama explained in a very elegant fashion how the lack of institutions in developing countries obstructs the implementation of the modern capitalist system and subsequently this causes impoverishment, corruption and violence in these countries. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing and started feeling uncomfortable when seconds later a catatonic feeling invaded me and while I was still able to see Mr. Fukuyama, his voice started fading away until I wasn’t able to hear anything. Suddenly I was seated in a café in Abuja the capital of Nigeria having tea with Mr. Fukuyama. “Diango you were telling me something about this Cuban Taíno Cacique (chief), right?” Yes Mr. Fukuyama, his name was Hatuey and he was the first to rebel against the invading Spaniards -actually he is considered the first fighter against colonialism in the New World- to make it short he was caught in 1512 and convicted to death by burning. In the moment when he was already tied to the stake a Spanish priest asked him if he would accept Jesus and go to heaven. Hatuey, thinking a little, asked the religious man if Spaniards went to heaven. The religious man answered yes… Hatuey then said without further thought: Thank you Mr. priest but I don’t want to go there. Bartolomé de Las Casas the 16th-century Spanish historian attributed the following speech to Hatuey -sorry Mr. Fukuyama but I have to Google this one- OK here it is: Hatuey showing the Taínos of Caobana a basket of gold and jewels, said: Here is the God the Spaniards worship. For these they fight and kill; for these they persecute us and that is why we have to throw them into the sea… They tell us, these tyrants, that they adore a God of peace and equality, and yet they usurp our land and make us their slaves. They speak to us of an immortal soul and of their eternal rewards and punishments, and yet they rob our belongings, seduce our women, violate our daughters. Incapable of matching us in valour, these cowards cover themselves with iron that our weapons cannot break…(1) I started having the feeling that I was running out of time but before going back to Amsterdam I had to tell him one more thing. Mr. Fukuyama I have seen sculptures on fire and frozen paintings, I have lived the life of an artist and I am exhausted of dreaming, I have the right to be lazy and I want back what you or someone like you took away from Hatuey, an existence without work. Art is the biggest achievement of peace and history is the worst painting ever painted. (1) Bartolomé de Las Casas, “Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies”. Translated by Nigel Griffin. (London: Penguin, 1999) ISBN 0-14-044562-5. *This text has been written after lonelyfingers (Anne Pöhlmann and Diango Hernández) attended to “Metamodernism – The return of History”. Stedelijk Museum ...

Socialist Nature or the utopia of the ordinary by Gerhard Obermüller for "Socialist Nature", book published by DISTANZ

Hernández circulates the concept of nature in a much more ambiguous manner in this exhibition, however. The ambivalence of socialism’s handling of nature and the environment has been a topic of concern for Diango Hernández for some time. Even if there may well have been more destruction of nature under capitalism than in many communist countries, the artist sees a fundamental difference in how people reflect on this ...

Spiritual Discovery by Timotheus Vermeulen for "Socialist Nature"

The thought experiment Hernández has initiated here, one that I have tried to develop further here, is to think of what nature produced by ideology performs other than that ideology. He sets out on a journey to discover all the subplots that have been activated that run against or parallel to or divert from ideology—all the subplots, that is, that unexpectedly and effectively express ...

Ways of knowing by Timotheus Vermeulen for Frieze magazine On the installation, sculptures and drawings of Diango Hernández, Dec. 2014

The art of Diango Hernández defies easy categorization. Although much of his work is inspired by his experiences of Cuba – where he was born in 1970 and lived until the age of 33 – he is not an émigré artist in the vein of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn or Joseph Brodsky. And while many of his projects are concerned with displacement and origin, his work does not sit comfortably within the genre of diasporic ...

El exilio cubano como obra de arte por Barbara Celis para El confidencial Dec. 2013

ondres expone los trabajos de Ana Mendieta y Diango Hernández. Cuba desgarra y enamora, azota y abraza, se añora y se odia, duele por dentro pero también desde la distancia. Es difícil que la isla te deje indiferente, tanto si la has visitado como si sólo conoces su historia. Pero para los artistas cubanos parece inevitable que la isla se convierta en el ADN de su obra, aunque los buenos creadores no lo hagan de forma explícita. Dos visiones del arte marcadas por Cuba pueden explorarse estos días en Londres: por un lado una retrospectiva inaugurada ayer en la Hayward Gallery dedicada a Ana Mendieta (1948-1985), visceral, cruda, instintiva, donde el exilio obligado a los doce años y la pérdida del lugar de pertenencia fueron la chispa que encendió el camino hacia sus múltiples experimentaciones artísticas, truncadas por una muerte abrupta y oscura a los 36 años. Por otro lado una exposición individual de Diango Hernández (1970), un creador de una generación más reciente, hoy afincado en Alemania, marcado por otras circunstancias, que encuentra en la galería Marlborough Contemporary hasta el 26 de octubre un espacio para la reflexión y la ironía, donde su paso por la llamada ‘beca’ (internados donde los adolescentes cubanos trabajaban en el campo y estudiaban) se convierte en punto de partida para ahondar en la memoria. “Es precisamente en el origen, más allá de ser cubanos, que tenemos mucho en común. Ana Mendieta fue uno de los niños conocidos como Peter Pan, nombre que se le dio a ese plan macabro orquestado por La Habana y Miami que separó de sus familias en Cuba a más de 14.000 niños entre los años 1960 y 1962. Los niños fueron recolocados en 30 estados de los Estados Unidos, muchos de ellos ni siquiera llegaron a saber que habían nacido en Cuba. La obra de Ana Mendieta siempre me ha inspirado mucho al igual que la obra de Félix González Torres. Ellos, como muchos otros artistas cubanos, se han conectado con el mundo a través de su arte, con el mundo que en principio se les negó” explica Hernández a El Confidencial. Es la primera vez que una gran institución británica le dedica una retrospectiva a Mendieta, una artista en proceso de revalorización, difícil de clasificar, extrema, provocativa, doliente, que tocó múltiples disciplinas, partiendo de la performance y el body art para después explorar el land art con su propio cuerpo, la escultura, la fotografía, el dibujo… Comenzó su carrera en la universidad de Iowa, donde la violación de otra estudiante la llevó a introducirse en el mundo de la performance de temática feminista, dejando así de lado la pintura – “no es suficientemente real” decía-, para abrazar ese momento experimental por el que pasaron muchos artistas plásticos en los setenta, creando obras efímeras, intangibles, muchas de ellas utilizando su propia sangre y cuya permanencia en el tiempo depende del trabajo de documentación hecho por la propia artista. Mendieta tomaba docenas de fotografías de sus performances, que hoy pueden explorarse en la última parte de la muestra, donde se exhiben sus archivos personales por primera vez: hojas de contactos, cientos de diapositivas, películas de super-8, correspondencia… La exposición arranca precisamente con imágenes de algunas de sus primeras performances para después adentrarse en lo que se consideran sus mejores obras, las Siluetas, que realizó a lo largo de casi una década. Acompañada de por vida por el desgarro de haber tenido que abandonar Cuba, Mendieta comenzó a trabajar en sus siluetas en México, un país en el que encontró la conexión con la tierra que perdió tras su exilio. Excavaba su silueta en la arena y después le pegaba fuego, o utilizaba su propio cuerpo y lo enterraba bajo mantos de flores, o se momificaba en el barro… Sus siluetas, que ella definió como earth body sculptures tomaban en cierto modo la forma de rituales mágicos o funerarios, algo que también la conectaba con las tradiciones santeras de su Cuba natal. El que se hubiera sentido atraída por las costumbres y tradiciones relacionadas con la muerte y el renacer de los indígenas mexicanos y precolombinos incita a conectarlo con su propia muerte, como si hubiera sido una premonición fatalista. Mendieta se precipitó desde un piso 34 en Nueva York una noche de septiembre tras una discusión con su esposo, el escultor Carl Andre, quien fue juzgado y absuelto por su supuesto homicidio. Al caer, su cabeza dejó una silueta sobre la terraza en la que se incrustó. Desde entonces las oscuras circunstancias de su muerte se han interpuesto siempre entre la artista y su obra. De ahí que Stephanie Rosenthal, comisaria de esta exposición titulada Huellas, haya optado por obviar toda esa parte culebrónica que siempre se le dedica a Mendieta y se haya centrado en resaltar la fuerza y la energía de una carrera que de haber continuado posiblemente la hubiera convertido en una de las grandes artistas contemporáneas. Diango Hernández, hombre nuevo Diango Hernández, -al contrario que Mendieta-, creció y se educó en el régimen castrista, donde la idea de Hombre Nuevo, Mujer Nueva que da título a su exposición, se forja en las aulas escolares. “Todas mis libretas y cuadernos en la escuela primaria tenían impreso sobre sus cubiertas una frase de José Martí: ‘Ser cultos para ser libres’. Todo el proyecto educativo revolucionario se dirigía hacia esa dirección quimérica que es ser libres, ¿pero qué se puede hacer cuando lo culto sólo sirve a los intereses de una sola voz? ¿Se podría hablar de cultura sin libertad? Yo definitivamente creo que no. La cultura es únicamente la expresión de la libertad. Todo lo que hemos producido en ausencia de libertad es bochornoso y aquí no solo incluiría la educación en Cuba sino también las pirámides de Egipto” afirma. La exposición de Hernández, de 43 años, va más allá de la crítica velada al régimen cubano y la amplía a otros regímenes totalitarios. Una veintena de superficies grises de grafito, aparentemente vacías ocupan las paredes ...