Solos

Eugene at Kunsthalle Münster curated by Gail B. Kirkpatrick and Marcus Lütkemeyer Opening on Sunday 28th of June at 3:00 p.m.

If a pessimist were to dismiss travel as pointless - that any journey entails consenting to the company of one’s self - then the sensually charged installations, material assemblages, drawings, photographs, and pictures of Diango Hernández sends the viewer on a journey that presents an inspired opportunity to be both simultaneously outside of one’s self and contained within ...
By all means I am here

By all means I am here Solo booth curated by Katerina Gregos at Art Brussels 2014 with Marlborough Contemporary

“I move accompanied” by Diango Hernández ere I am moving in between to parallel lines, one has been drawn inside and the other hasn’t been located yet but certainly my body moves strangely back and forth trying to find it. Four walls, in this case not imaginary walls have defined the complete space; they are made out of bricks and painted in white. I have been here before, many times, too many. I know this space too well, better than I know myself, I move again trying to occupy a spot that I think I did not occupied before. In a previous letter I mentioned him and I am convinced that I have shown you images of his work before but it doesn’t matter now, anyway here I am sending you a small clip of one of his early works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qml505hxp_c In an imaginary space I move accompanied only by my memory -inside this space I perform- and out there somewhere, you exist. These two spaces are well defined by both, imaginary and real walls but there is something else that stays permanently in between us, something that we agreed on calling distance. My space is not approachable but nevertheless you can see me from where you are and that allows me to be invisible of course not for you nor for the others but for myself. It is only by the absent performer and the presence and persistence of the viewer that memory reveals its more interesting face. When I realized that you, the viewer was looking for me, in that same moment I became you and by that I mean the reality vanished. Sat 25 – Mon 27 April Art Brussels 2014   ...

In hazard, translated Solo exhibition curated by Simone Neuenschwander, Kunstverein Nürnberg, Germany

“In hazard” by Diango Hernández   oming out there into the blackness the blast hit him in the mouth, stopping his breath. He tried to gasp, but he could not: something pungent had filled his lungs, so that they retched and shuddered in the attempt to breathe. The wind was wrapping it round him in hot, greasy blasts. His unseeing eyes poured with water, smarted as in mustard gas. He must be in a cloud of dense smoke: but he could not see it, of course—the night could be no darker than it was anyhow. He had no idea where it came from: possibly the fiddley. The thing to do now was to find his way to the Bridge—if his lungs held out. Keeping his head with an effort of will, he began to feel his way along, holding his breath (what little breath he had), resisting the dangerous temptation to hurry.” (1) During the afternoon of November 9, 1932 in the southeast of Cuba, a powerful short blast of wind violently snatched thousands of pieces of fruit from their trees; for more than five minutes, oranges, mangoes and papayas flew frenetically around like only scared birds know how. The next morning, on November 10, the coastal village of Santa Cruz del Sur and its 3,000 inhabitants had disappeared. During the previous night and in the space of a few minutes, the sea, with gigantic waves measuring five metres high in places, flooded miles of land. That same night and not faraway off the coast from Santa Cruz del Sur, the S.S Phemius, under the command of Captain D.L.C Evans, was caught up for four days in the same category 5 hurricane that had erased the village of Santa Cruz del Sur. A couple of years later, Captain Evans asked Richard Hughes to write about these desperate four days. In 1938 Richard Hughes published In Hazard, a novel in which the protagonist was not the hurricane but the will of the survivor, the fight of man against the gigantic fury of a cataclysm, human nature physiologically and physically naked in the face of inevitable and extreme circumstances. “Only after he had published the book did Hughes himself comprehend its subtext: it is an anticipation of the physical upheaval of the second world war, but embodies also the virtues individuals would need to demonstrate if they were to survive the challenge presented by the war.” (2) It would seem as if cataclysms not only unchain devastating natural events, but also sequences of social catastrophes; as though the flying fruit of Santa Cruz del Sur on November 9, 1932 would fall years later as bombs all over Europe. I was sitting, the piazza was crowded, between my hands I had a picture that I decided to look at without thinking, without saying anything to myself, I was just looking at it in silence allowing my eyes to rove over an image that was monumentally frozen. I wouldn’t have wanted to see that image in motion; there are events that only happen to have been photographed as if sometimes in a photograph, even the sun and the wind have been hired to pose for the prism in front of the fatal eye of a photographer. There are also many photographs that depict a reality that hasn’t had happened yet; they are a form of prediction, like the weather forecast showing us a satellite image which tells us that the hurricane is just five miles away. But is it possible to photograph an event that hasn’t happened yet? Is it possible that a person is alive without being born? I am leaving; I said to myself and while I was getting up, I consciously dropped the photograph and without looking back, I left the piazza, knowing that once the photograph touched the grass, it would no longer be a photograph, but a piece of reality.   (1). Richard Hughes, In Hazard (New York, 2008). First published in 1938. (2) Quote of Richard Poole; source: http://www.richardpoole.net/criticism/richardhughes.aspx Richard Poole is a world authority on the work of Richard Hughes. His critical biography Richard Hughes, Novelist – was published by Poetry Wales Press, as was Fiction as Truth: Selected Literary Writings by Richard Hughes, which he edited. “In hazard, translated” 1. March 11. May 2014 Kunstverein Nürnberg Albrecht Dürer Gesellschaft Kressengartenstraße 2 D-90402 Nürnberg T. +49 (0) 911 241 562 F. +49 (0) 911 241 563 mail@kunstvereinnuernberg.de “Als er hinaustrat in die Finsternis, schoss ihm der Luftstoß in den Mund und raubte ihm den Atem. Er wollte Luft schnappen, es ging nicht: Etwas Stechendes war in seine Lungen gedrungen, und beim Versuch zu atmen würgte und schüttelte es ihn. Der Sturm hüllte ihn in heiße, fettige Schwaden. Er sah nichts mehr, seine Augen tränten und brannten wie von Senfgas. Er musste in einer dichten Rauchwolke stehen, aber natürlich konnte er sie nicht erkennen – es herrschte sowieso pechschwarze Nacht. Er hatte keine Ahnung, wo es herkam, vielleicht vom Schornsteinmantel. Jetzt galt es, den Weg zur Brücke zu finden – wenn seine Lungen mitspielten. Er versuchte, klaren Kopf zu bewahren, und tastete sich langsam Schritt für Schritt vorwärts, wobei er die Luft anhielt (den kleinen Rest, den er noch in der Lunge hatte) und der gefährlichen Versuchung widerstand, hastige Bewegungen zu machen.” (1) Am Nachmittag des 9. Novembers 1932 riss an der Südostküste Kubas ein kraftvoller kurzer Windstoss gewaltsam Tausende von Früchten von den Bäumen und während mehr als fünf Minuten wirbelten Orangen, Mangos und Papayas heftig wie erschreckte Vögel umher. Am nächsten Morgen war das Dorf Santa Cruz del Sur und mit ihm 3000 Einwohner verschwunden. In der vorherigen Nacht haben gigantischen Flutwellen innerhalb nur weniger Minuten kilometerweit das Land überspült und in bestimmten Gebieten eine Höhe von bis zu fünf Metern erreicht. Zur gleichen Zeit und nicht weit weg von der Küste wurde das Schiff S.S Phemius unter dem Kommando von Kapitän D.L.C Evans für ganze vier Tage im gleichen Hurrikan der Kategorie 5 gefangen, ...

The New Man and The New Woman Solo exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary, London

“No-one” by Diango Hernández t is very early in the morning. The grass is covered with cold, dense dew. We haven’t even moved a hundred metres and my boots and trousers are already drenched and cold. The morning mist has turned my legs into two moving blades of grass. I try to walk as fast as I can and not to shiver, and I long for the sun to come up and make everything evaporate. An hour later, like we do every morning, we are all standing to attention like soldiers, each one of us facing an infinite furrow of exuberant tobacco plants. With our hoes in our left hands, we all shout in unison: “We will be like Che”. The tobacco plants and the weeds around them remain inert; our cry does not even move one leaf. Our voices quickly dissolve. It is worse each morning to work in silence. However, today I hear the same instruction, like a continuous, infinite echo that refuses to leave its cave. Throughout all those years I learnt how to differentiate the voices of my companions and today I manage to break the unity. I hear each voice separately and I am able to recognise each one of our faces as well as our minuscule bodies. Who amongst us is like Che? No-one! Who wants to be like Che? No-one! Who would have wanted to be like Che? No-one!   “The New man and the new woman” September 18 – October 26, 2013 Marlborough Contemporary 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY +44 (0)20 7629 5161 marlboroughcontemporary.com Press release Diango Hernández links personal and collective memory, blurring the line between conflicting poetic and political points of view. Born in Cuba and now living in Düsseldorf, Germany, after having travelled the world, Hernández has acquired a reversed perspective on colonialism and political structures. An outsider everywhere, as much in Cuba as in Europe, he has invariably been shaped by his communist education. Hernández believes that all art is autobiographical but also incorporates the collective organised structures that give shape to history. This exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary, comprising all new works, draws on his past experience while growing up in Cuba. For example, when children reached 12 years of age, they would be sent to a boarding school until they were 18; the students worked in tobacco fields in the morning and studied in the afternoon. They were learning to be New Men and New Women, or so they were told. The teenagers were taught quotations of Che, including the words that triggered this body of work: ‘To build communism it is necessary, simultaneous with the new material foundations, to build the new man and woman… Revolutionaries will come who will sing the song of the new man and woman in the true voice of the people…’ (Che Guevara) Creating a new man and a new woman, as a utopian concept, was not only perpetuated by communist regimes. It comes as no surprise that Hernández also references Germany and Italy’s fascist pasts. Hernández’s new drawings feature textured images due to the particular treatment of graphite on wood. Their source is a German porcelain factory catalogue of the 1930s: Allach produced appealing, low-cost porcelains, accessible to every house, due to concentration camp labour. On the other hand, Hernández also goes back to the architecture of the boarding schools in Cuba, ‘H’-shaped structures which share striking affinities with a project by the Italian architect Castiglioni. For his exams at the Milan Polytechnic, the architect created an ‘H’- shaped maquette for a fascist building. Of course, Castiglioni was making a critique of the regime as his choice of material suggests: his building was made out of cheese slices. Inspired by this contradictory coincidence of a building structured for rebellion and the communist education system – in Cuba, the ‘H’ buildings were gendered; boys and girls occupied separate wings and met in the middle to study – Diango Hernández has created a cheese maquette of his own. The New Man and the New Woman at Marlborough Contemporary is Diango Hernández’s first solo exhibition in the UK. Hernández will have solo shows at Mostyn, Llandudno and at Kunstverein Nürnberg in 2014. He has participated in many group shows in international institutions, such as MOMA in New York and the Hayward Gallery in London. His work has been presented at the 2005 Venice Biennale, the 2006 Biennales in São Paulo and Sydney and the 2010 Liverpool Biennial. A major solo exhibition was held at MART, Rovereto, in 2012. Diango Hernández ‘The New Man and The New Woman’ (El hombre nuevo y la mujer nueva) Es muy temprano en la mañana, toda la hierva esta cargada de un rocío frío y denso. No hemos avanzado ni siquiera 100 metros y ya mis botas y pantalones están empapados y fríos, la humedad de la mañana ha convertido mis piernas en dos tallos de yerbas andantes. Intento caminar lo mas rápido que pueda y no titiritar, espero deseoso a que salga el sol para que lo evapore todo. Una hora mas tarde, como cada mañana, ya estamos todos parados como soldados en posición de firmes cada uno de frente a un infinito surco de exuberantes plantas de tabaco, con nuestros azadones en la mano izquierda gritamos al unísono, ‘seremos como el Che’. Las plantas de tabaco y sus malas hierbas permanecen inertes, nuestro grito no logra mover ni siquiera una hoja, rápidamente nuestras voces se mezclan con lo peor de cada mañana: trabajar en silencio. Todavía hoy escucho la misma consigna, es como un eco continuo e infinito que se niega a abandonar su cueva. Durante todos estos años he aprendido a diferenciar las voces de mis compañeros y ya hoy logro romper el unísono, escucho todas y cada una de nuestras voces por separado y logro reconocer cada una de nuestras caras y también nuestros diminutos cuerpos. Quien de nosotros es como el Che? Nadie! Quien quisiera ser como el Che? Nadie! Quien ...

The importance of the line Solo exhibition curated by Nuno Faria at Porta 33, Madeira, Portugal

"Transferir" refere-se ao desafio de traduzir e de transformar a linha num objecto tridimensional. Carrega consigo um sentido de realização, de corporização, inerente ao desenho enquanto projecto. Um desenho é de todas as formas um objecto tridimensional tal como os pensamentos e as ideias o são. Neste exercício, trabalhou-se a importância de utilizar desenhos como referência para outros desenhos. A escala, os materiais, a dimensão do desenho foram aferidos pelo valor da história que se quer contar. Aqui, o lápis foi posto de ...