Solos

Drawing the Human Figure Solo exhibition curated by Nuno Faria at Fondazione Brodbeck, Catania

“The” skull by Diango Hernández he skull, a hard, bone structure, is the shape-giving form which makes all heads relatively the same. Of course, there are variations in the shapes of skulls. There are long-headed men and wide-headed men and skulls vary in shape in different geographic locales. But in essence, the skull can be reduced to the general flat shape of an oval and in volume, an egg-shaped form. This generalization, variable in the extreme, is still a most usable one in drawing the first structural characteristic of a head. This is what Arthur Zaidenberg wrote in the chapter The Head in his book Drawing the Human Figure. How are you today? I hope fine, I am Dr. Christopher Harrison from Harlesden, North West London, here in England. I work for Credit Suisse Bank London. I am writing you from my office which will be of a great immense benefit for both of us. In my department, being the assistant manager (Greater London region), I discovered an abandoned sum of $16.5 Million Pound (Sixteen Million Five hundred Thousand Pound sterling) in an account that belongs to one of our foreign customers Late Mr. Moses Saba, a Jew from Mexico that was a victim of a helicopter crash early this year, killing him and family members. Saba was 46-years-old. Also in the chopper at the time of the crash was his wife, their son Avraham (Albert) and his daughter-in-law. The pilot was also dead. This is the beginning of what Dr. Christopher Harrison wrote not only to me but provably also to you… Years ago I used to think -life is filled with surprisingly funny surprises. For example if I would have gotten the same letter from Dr. Christopher Harrison from Harlesden 20 years ago I would have immediately believed in it and without a single doubt I would have answered him with a very polite and enthusiastic hand written letter. Today mine / ours mailboxes are jammed with ‘funny’ surprises and with terrific false news that go directly to our junk mailboxes, yes into this little container that is full of huge lotteries rewards to be immediately collected, millionaire transactions that we will receive soon, free wonderful sex and some other amusements. Our junk mailboxes are astonishing imaginary places stuffed with tenting promises of a better life. All we have to do is to CLICK, as simple as that, with a very elemental move of our index finger we’ll get there, probably if we CLICK we would meet Dr. Christopher Harrison whom would be waiting for us at the Victorian station ready to hand us a huge leather suitcase fill with $16.5 Million Pound. Out of my junk mailbox I have created ‘Drawing the Human Figure’ an exhibition that most of all connects under the same roof Hope, Waste and Lines. The most reasonable way to talk about this exhibition is maybe with the following equation: H+ L/W = Ba-p* H= HOPE L= LINES W= WASTE Ba-p= Believe again – please   “Drawing the Human Figure” Opening on 25 March 27 March – 26 May 2012 Fondazione Brodbeck Via Gramignani, 93 95121 Catania, Italy +39 095 723 3111 www.fondazionebrodbeck.it Il progetto Cretto, che giunge con Diango Hernández alla sua seconda mostra, è stato concepito concettualmente a partire da per il luogo in cui viene presentato: la Fondazione Brodbeck a Catania, in Sicilia. Il progetto ha avuto un lungo tempo di maturazione che ha incluso viaggi di preparazione, varie sessioni di lavoro con i responsabili artistici della Fondazione e ore di discussione con gli artisti che saranno presentati durante i prossimi tre anni. L’obiettivo iniziale al quale abbiamo tenuto fede, era quello di proporre un progetto che in qualche modo fosse complementare al progetto Fortino1 curato da Helmut Friedel e Giovanni Iovane e che presentasse artisti provenienti dal sud Europa o dall’America Latina (Portogallo, Cuba, Brasile) i cui interventi devono essere preceduti da un periodo di residenza a Catania. Se il titolo del progetto evoca inevitabilmente lo spirito e l’energia mitologica del luogo ricordando un doppio momento/monumento contemporaneo, fondatore del concetto di memoria quale incaricata a preservare e trasmettere l’energia nel tempo, esso si riferisce, allo stesso tempo, al significato letterale della parola: crepa, intervallo, taglio. Nuno Faria Curatore indipendente. Vive e lavora tra Lisbona e Loulé, Algarve, Portogallo. Curatore di MOBILEHOME, scuola d’arte nomade, sperimentale e indipendente a Loulé. Professore del corso di Arti Visive all’Università dell’Algarve e al Master in fotografia all’Istituto Politecnico di Tomar. Direttore artistico dell’International Center for the Arts José de Guimarães che aprirà prossimamente, Guimarães, capitale europea della cultura 2012. Project In collaboration with Benveniste Contemporary, Madrid Il cranio, struttura ossea dura e rigida, è la forma che rende tutte le teste relativamente uguali. Chiaramente esistono varie forme di cranio: ci sono uomini con una scatola cranica lunga e uomini con un cranio largo e, inoltre, il cranio varia nella forma in base alla sua provenienza geografica. Ma, nella sua essenza, il cranio può essere ridotto, genericamente, alla forma piatta di un ovale e, nel suo volume, alla forma di un uovo. Questa generalizzazione, variabile all’estremo, è ancora la più usata nel disegnare la prima caratteristica strutturale di una testa. Questo è ciò che Arthur Zaidenberg ha scritto nel capitolo “The Head”, nel suo libro intitolato “Drawing the Human Figure”. “Come stai oggi? Spero bene, io sono il Dr. Christopher Harrison di Harlesden, Nord Ovest di Londra, qui in Inghilterra. Lavoro per la Credit Suisse Bank di Londra. Ti scrivo dal mio ufficio, cosa che sarà di immenso beneficio per entrambi. Nel mio dipartimento, ricoprendo io la carica di assistant manager (nella regione della Greater London), ho scoperto una somma abbandonata pari a 16.5 milioni di pound (sedici milioni e cinquecento mila sterline) in un conto che appartiene ad uno dei nostri clienti stranieri, il defunto Mr. Moses Saba, un ebreo messicano, vittima di un incidente in elicottero, avvenuto all’inizio di quest’anno, che ha ucciso lui e i membri della sua famiglia. Saba ...

Folded Tiger Solo exhibition at Philara Collection, Dusseldorf, Germany

“Tigres” by Diango Hernández   he following passage appears (textually) in the first page of Guillermo Cabrera Infante’s most glorious and delicious book, Tres Tristes Tigres (Three Sad Tigers) 1967, translated into English as Three Trapped Tigers. Because this book and for this book I have made ‘Folded Tiger’. My thoguhts about tigers match perfectly with my fantasies about color and freedom and this happened because you Señor Guillermo. For you and for all the flavors that you mastered with your words. Thank you! … For your exclusive pleasure, ladies and gentlemen our Good Neighbours, you that are now in Cuba, the most beautiful land human eyes have ever seen, as Christofry Columbus, The Discoverer, said once, you, happy visitors, are once and for all, welcome. WelCOME to Cuba! All of you… be WELLcome! Bienvenidos, as we say in our romantic language, the language of colonizadors and toreros (bullfighters) and very, very, but very (I know what I say) beautiful duennas. I know that you are here to sunbathe and seabathe and sweatbathe Jo jo jo… My excuses, thousand of apologies for You-There that are freezing in this cold of the rich, that sometimes is the chill of our coollness and the sneeze of our colds: the Air Conditioned I mean. For you as for every-one here, its time to get warm and that will be with our coming show. In fact, to many of you it will mean heat! And I mean, with my apologies to the very, very oldfashioned ladies in the audience, I mean, Heat. And when, ladies and gentlemen, I mean heat is HEAT! Sammlung Philara e.V. c/o Gil Bronner Grimmstraße 8 40235 Düsseldorf ...

Lonely fingers Solo exhibition curated by Georg Elben at Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl

“Her lonely fingers” by Diango Hernández n that cold ‘second hand store’, in the middle of an immense chaos and covered with multiple layers of dust, I found Anni’s W. drawings folder. It was sold to me for 3 Euros. I walked away from that place, slowly and with guilt. In that moment I didn’t know if whether I was a thief or a pioneer. I discovered an extraordinary beautiful thing and by discovering it I rescued it from the dirty ‘hands’ of Mr. Forget but at the same time, I had the feeling that buying it for 3 Euros wasn’t right, in fact I believed it was a crime. I arrived home one hour later, immediately I opened the folder and very slowly started seeing one by one Anni’s drawings. I am lucky again, in that moment I felt extremely alive. I didn’t know Anni W. and I wasn’t interested in starting a research about her person or life, instead I wanted to get to know her drawings which means to me, I wanted to know Anni’s dreams. After seeing each of the drawings I was sure that I would find a precise context to present them, a context in which all folders alike Anni’s could be seeing wearing a nice smile. Without knowing or wanting Anni W. changed the way I see drawings. A drawing can’t be beautiful if is perfect; to draw means to be alive and to display a drawing is not an act of vanity but a necessity. None of Anni’s W. drawings were dated; most of them have her signature accompanied with the teacher’s notes in red. Imagining a date for each one of Anni’s W. drawings has been my only contribution to her treasure folder. Today time seems to be of no relevance but still when it comes to the understanding of a diary, time is everything. “Lonely fingers” 12 Dec. – 5 Feb. 2012 Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl Creiler Platz, Rathaus 45768 Marl skulpturenmuseum@marl.de + 49 (0)2365 / 99 22 57 “lonely fingers” exhibition is accompanied by a book published by Distanz Verlag. Editor: Georg, German / English, 21 x 27 cm, 140 pages, approx. 120 color images, hardcover, ISBN ...

Crystal Clear Solo exhibition at Nicolas Krupp Gallery, Basel

“The humid image” by Diango Hernández  massive amount of water particles went back, invisibly and slowly, to where they came from – to the sky. Only rests of colors, dissolved paper and fragments of plaster and terracotta remained on the floor. The shelves and some tables were still in good shape, but most of the sculptures were broken or just vanished because of the heavy rain. The roof was partially gone; its large wood bars fell down and crashed every single fragile object in the room, the whole studio looked like a destroyed ceremony’s temple  after an earthquake. Years after the studio of Florencio Gelabert got ‘dispersed’ into the earth of Havana City, someone offered me a drawing; which I immediately recognized as an original Gelabert. The drawing was a gentle charcoal study of a boy’s head. The head was smartly positioned in the corner of the paper and the boy with his careless expression seemed to look into the center of the sheet. What really called my attention in this particular drawing was its actual state; in the middle of the paper there was a big water stain, which appeared to me to be as important as the drawing itself. While looking at it the water stain drew a monster’s head, which in few seconds mutated at least into three different abominable figures. I couldn’t tell if the water stain was under or above the boy’s head. The water went all the way through the charcoal, deep inside the paper fibers. It was hard to tell, what was there first on that piece of paper: the drawing or the stain. By now both stories shares the same area of the paper, which in no way whatsoever makes them equal. I believe this drawing was floating somewhere on the water for a couple of days, until someone just took it and put it directly inside a folder. Immediately I started thinking of the catastrophe that many years ago happened to F. Gelabert’s studio. Definitely this was one of the drawings, which someone ‘rescued’ from his devastated studio. I didn’t hesitate and I bought the drawing right away. For years I’ve called this drawing The boy and the stain and I still keep it in the same place, where I have a collection of intriguing things, because The Boy and the stain mainly contains a series of invisible ‘accidents’ that fascinate me. The exhibition Crystal Clear unfolds stories of dissolved images, destroyed artists’ studios and some other types of evaporation. What it seems to be a water stain now appears in front of us as a drawing itself; multiple printed images of Villeroy and Boch glasses from a 1936 catalog have been ‘filled’ with seductive translucent watercolors, which invite us to ‘drink’ again from the same imaginary glass. Nicolas Krupp Rosentalstrasse 28 4058 Basel, Switzerland +41 61 683 32 65 www.nicolaskrupp.com angsam und unsichtbar ging eine riesige Menge von Wasserpartikeln dorthin zurück, woher sie herkam : zum Himmel. Nur Farbresten, zersetzte Papiere und Fragmente von Gips und Terracotta blieben auf dem Boden zurück. Die Gestelle und einige Tische waren immer noch in gutem Zustand. Die meisten Skulpturen waren kaputt oder haben sich im starken Regen aufgelöst. Das Dach war teilweise weg, die schweren Balken fielen auf all die fragilen Objekte im Raum hinunter und zerstörten sie. Das ganze Studio sah aus wie eine zerstörte Tempelzeremonie nach einem Erdbeben. Jahre nachdem das Studio von Florencio Gelabert im Erdboden von Havanna City verschwunden war, offerierte mir jemand eine Zeichnung, die ich sofort als Original Gelabert erkannte. Das Blatt war eine feine Kohlezeichnung, eine Studie eines Knabenkopfes. Der Kopf war elegant in der Ecke des Blattes positioniert und der Knabe mit seinem sorglosen Ausdruck erweckte den Anschein, als würde er ins Zentrum des Blattes schauen. Meine ganze Aufmerksamkeit galt aber dem aktuellen Zustand der Zeichnung. In der Mitte des Blattes gab es einen grossen Wasserfleck, der bei mir den Eindruck erweckte, er sei so wichtig wie die Zeichnung selbst. Beim genauren Betrachten bildete der Wasserfleck einen Monsterkopf, der sich in mindestens 3 verschiedene grässliche Figuren verwandelte. Dabei war ich mir nicht sicher, ob der Wasserfleck unter oder über dem Knabenkopf war. Das Wasser ging durch die Kohle, tief in die Blattfasern hinein. Es war schwierig zu sagen, was zuerst da war : die Zeichnung oder der Fleck. Inzwischen teilen sich die beiden Geschichten in dieselbe Stelle des Blattes, was sie aber keinesfalls als gleichwertig erscheinen lässt. Ich glaube, dass diese Zeichnung irgendwo während mehrerer Tage im Wasser trieb, bevor sie jemand fand und dann sogleich in eine Mappe legte. Sofort kam mir die Katastrophe in den Sinn, die Florencio Gelabert vor vielen Jahren widerfahren war. Das war mit Sicherheit eine dieser Zeichnungen, die jemand aus dem zerstörten Studio gerettet hat. Ich zögerte keinen Augenblick und kaufte die Zeichnung. Schon vor Jahren nannte ich die Zeichnung The boy and the stain und sie weilt immer noch am gleichen Ort, wo ich eine Sammlung irritierender Objekte aufbewahre : The boy and the stain enthält eine Serie unsichtbarer Unfälle – das fasziniert mich. Die Ausstellung Crystal Clear legt Geschichten von aufgelösten Bildern, zerstörten Künstler Studios und anderen Formen von Evaporationen offen. Was heute als Wasserfleck wahrgenommen wird, taucht vor uns als eigenständige Zeichnung auf. Mehrfach gedruckte Bilder von Villeroy and Boch-Gläsern aus einem Katalog von 1936 wurden mit verführerischen transparenten Wasserfarben gefüllt. Sie laden uns ein, wiederum aus demselben imaginären Glas zu ...

If I send you this Solo exhibition at Alexander & Bonin, NY (Press release / Installation views)

ernández has transformed the architecture of the first floor gallery to accommodate two site specific installations which re-appropriate the geometric ‘cat eye’ shape of Gordon Matta-Clark’s 1975 “Days End.” He has re-imagined this cut to represent an escape from a space of restriction to a space of freedom, and has re-termed it an exeunt. For the artist, the exeunt represents the highest expression of the merger of geometry and ideology. In the main gallery, narrowed by approximately three feet, one large exeunt has been sawed from a wall; adjacent to this cut, seven translucent envelopes contain parts of an incomplete image of an office in the American Embassy in Cuba – a building unused for its intended purpose since January 1961. For three neighboring exeunt sculptures Hernández has altered components of a 1940s desk. The desk top, in If a Desk, if Rose (2011), hangs vertically: dime-sized perforations in the wood hold carefully rolled Cuban stamps issued since the Bay of Pigs invasion attempt. The motifs embodied in the installations recur in collages, sculptures, letters, and paintings on view through the first and second floor of the gallery. The exeunt appears again, perhaps most mystically, protected by a Plexiglass window in the first floor rear gallery. A floor covered in carefully looped analog tape leads you to an exeunt cut from a large roll of wallpaper and lit from above by a neon tube. The dated technology represented by the analog tape, mute without its accompanying audio device, reiterates the barrier between audience and content, past and present. Born in Cuba in 1970, Diango Hernández began his artistic practice as a co-founder of Ordo Amoris Cabinet, a group of artists and designers who focused on invented solutions for home design objects to compensate for a permanent shortage of materials and goods. In 2006 he exhibited at the Biennale of Sydney and the São Paulo Biennial and in 2005 his work was exhibited in the Arsenale as part of the 51st Venice Biennale. His work has been the subject of several one-person museum exhibitions: Kunsthalle, Basel (2006), Neuer Aachener Kunstverein (2007) and Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Siegen (2009).   In November 2011, Hernández’ work will be the subject of a survey exhibition at Museo di arte moderna e contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto in Italy. “If I send you this” September 6-October 12, 2011 Alexander and Bonin, New York. Alexander and Bonin 132 Tenth Avenue New York NY – 10011 www.alexanderandbonin.com ...

Line Dreamers Solo exhibition at Haus im Süden c/o Boucherie

here will be always a fundamental confrontation between an object and its drawing, the same kind of confrontation that can occur in between the idea and the words that express it. This confrontation happens not only in an abstract form it happens as a real fact, bringing the object to exist in a permanent disappointed reality, a reality that can’t be as perfect and ideal as a drawing is. ‘Line Dreamers’ is just a thought that pretend to transform a second hand furniture shop into an unexpected overlaying of objects and drawings. I can’t define yet what came first – The drawing or the object? and maybe ‘Line Dreamers’ could help me to find out.   HAUS IM SÜDEN c/o BOUCHERIE Design des 20. Jahrhunderts Mauritiussteinweg 74 D- 50676 Köln. Öffnungszeiten: Fr 13 – 9 h; Sa 11 – 16 h /  info@marc-boucherie.de / Tel. 0221-80158800 /  www.marc-boucherie.de / info@galerie-wiesehoefer.de Tel. 0221-2706885 / www.galerie-wiesehoefer.de ...

a kiss, a hat, a stamp Solo exhibition at Blood Mountain Foundation, Budapest

lood Mountain Foundation is a non-profit arts organisation committed to generating fresh discourse about contemporary culture and current affairs. Based in Budapest (Hungary), it seeks inspiration from the city’s rich history and diverse cultural heritage and provides opportunities for exchange between local and international art practitioners and the broader community through curatorial and educational programmes, artists’ residencies and special projects. The Artist-in-Residence Programme offers up to four emerging to mid-career international artists the opportunity to live and work in Budapest for four-to-eight week periods each year. They are encouraged to engage with all facets of the city and to develop new work inspired by these experiences. Sourcing materials from a local artisan workshop, flea markets and antique dealerships, Hernández’s practice pays tribute to Budapest’s tradition of independent creative outlets and quality second-hand goods. The processes of finding, assembling, creating and re-appropriating are key motifs in his practice: by focussing on fragments (rather than whole objects) and edges (instead of obvious surface areas), Hernández’s found objects take on new forms and sentiment in their new-found setting. The exhibition comprises two sculptures, two wall paintings, a collage and a room installation in collaboration with Valéria Fazekas, a key member of Hungary’s diminishing artisan community. By positioning Fazekas’ unique headwear on a patina-ed bookshelf juxtaposed with press images of industry, collective sports and new architecture of the bygone Soviet era, Hernández’s poignant comment about the city’s past and present is striking. The understated exhibition design also lends relevance to the Foundation’s location on a former Ottoman era battleground and to the setting, which was once known as a Habsurg era family estate. As noted by Jade Niklai, Director of BMF: “Hernández’s deep insight and understated touch bring tremendous thought and emotion to unravelling the beauty of Budapest even for those who have known and lived in it for a lifetime. BMF is privileged and grateful to launch its residency programme with the participation of such a seminal artist.” Since January 2010, BMF’s Education Programme has provided opportunities for six to twelve year-olds to engage with contemporary art. During Hernández’s residency, a workshop for 16 to 18 year-old International Baccalaureate students at the British International School in Budapest will further expand the programme. Artist’s statement: If the Danube runs faster, glory and sadness will also do. Tom Sloan [BMF Trustee] showed me the Budapest that we want to remember and we won’t forget, Jade Niklai introduced me to the mysterious hats of Valéria Fazekas and now, after three weeks of a very intimate research through Budapest’s antique and furniture dealers, empty streets and wonderfully arranged storage rooms, Blood Mountain Foundation is opening “a kiss, a hat, a stamp. Catalogue “a kiss, a hat, a stamp” publised by Distanz, editor: Jade Niklai, Language: English, Format: 21 X 28 Cm, Feature: 70 Pages, 70 Color Images, Softcover [gigabox id=”2″] ...

Museums: Selected works 1996/2010 Solo exhibition at Galerie Michael Wiesehöfer

“REVANTGARDE” by Anke Kempkes n the 1990s Diango Hernández started an extended series of drawings which processed the political and economical crisis of Cuba after the collapse of the socialist systems in Eastern Europe. ’We lost the last support of the Sowiet Union, which meant confronting a big crisis. We knew about Perestroika and everyone was concerned: What was the political mistake? But the big confusion over the rising ecomomical crisis was soon predominanting. And then, inevetably, the daily life was taken over by the struggle for survival. (…) At the same time I began to make this big mass of drawings out of what was my personal point of view of the crisis. I did self-portraits, illusionary architectures and cities, projects which are never going to be realised.’ Coming from a backgorund of industrial design Diango Hernández formed the collaboration Gabinete Ordo Amoris with his friend Francis Acea. The artists collected everyday objects which were provisionally produced out the last resources people could get hold of. These objects were astonishing creations and they were the manifestation of a highly independent and individual reaction towards the broad circumstances of devastating poverty. IF THEY TAKE THE LIGHT AWAY I’ LL INVENT SOMETHING TO LIGHT MY HOUSE “These objects, pragmatic and strangely sculptural, had a special melancholic beauty, – they were products of a moment of dramatic transition’. Diango Hernández recognised their importance documenting a very particular chapter in Cuban social history. But the cheer anthropological activity of collecting seemed not to be satisfactory for his artistic sensibility and his understanding of the role an artists could take in this process. In his eyes a far more adequate tool, the activity of drawing functioned for Hernández as a political diary and positioned the artist in accordance with the new urban productivity which grew out of the daily needs. His artistic practice resonnated the perception of the crisis. ‘I was acting artistically out of a collective consciousness. Havana was a backdrop, a big landscape of mistakes. (…) I did it at home late at night and of course I could not tell this to anybody. In a modest and quiet way I began to comment on circumstances, places, opinions that poeple have. (…) They were hidden in my place without exposure which was actually in a way also a living condition of each of us. You can see some flashes from outside but what is really counting is what is happening inside. And it was happening in every family in every place. My practice was a document – writing, commenting, drawing -, the most sophisticated strategy for me.’ ARTE ES REVOLUCION In his drawings Hernández transformed the objects from the street into utopian configurations. They gain a new life of their own, morphing into numerous possibilities of self-structuring. Often these biting sceneries imply a self-portrait. Depicted in deliberately naive ways which remind of Chagall or Picasso, the face of the artist is suddenly attached to the body of a horse or another creature of a kind, chimeras carrying a mission, using the disguise of the animal as a subversive strategy. Hernández regarded himself at this point as a medium of the political constellation surrounding him, while it became equally important to him to stage his individual position and emotionality right in the center of the little universe he created in his obsessive ‚automatistically’ produced body of drawings. In actual fact he started to call his entire practise „drawing“, be it a complex installation, a sculpture or an accidental trace on a piece of paper. PASSION IS THE MOST SUBVERSIVE BEHAVIOR IN CAPITALISM BE SURE BEFORE BEING SURE BE LOST BEFORE BEING LOST BE IN LOVE BEFORE BEIG IN LOVE ‘After a while I had thousands of drawings in my house and I decided to come to Europe. Now I had something to say about what is a circumstance. It was a big testing to present them in the European context. They were not exotic items, no phantasy, rather they belong to a specific social history.’ However politically invested these drawings are, there is always this other phantastic side to them. Hernández’ iconography subtly relates here back to the narrative inventions of Cuban writer Alejo Carpentier. In his manifesto on The Marvelous Real (Lo real maravilloso) from 1949 Carpentier rejected the ‚pointless’ imagination of the Surrealists for not being rooted enough in reality. For him the tropics with all there exotism, erotism and anti-colonial struggles constitute the ideal surreal imagination. MORE TROPI CALS REVOLUTIONS In his novel The Kingdom of This World Carpentier re-enacts the time of Haiti’s liberation from French colonialist rule, a period of unsurpassed brutality, horror, and superstition. The ancient slave Ti-Noel becomes the key-figure, the leader of an a new type of guerrilla, escaping his prosecution by transforming with the help of voodoo into the bodies of different animals. HOW COULD EXIST DEMOCRACY IF WE ARE SLAVES Diango Hernández’ use of romantic and phantastic motifs in his drawings is an attempt to formulate and enable a new position in contemporary art which owes a lot to the specific political and historical background he comes from. The disturbing presence of the conventional, icons of beauty and desire in his works are propositions for a future which is open to a strong imagination also in the realm of the political. ‘These works are subversive in a subtle way, because there is beauty implied in each of them. And I really like to keep it as a key for making communication possible through them. I am not interested in inventing something new, in pursuing a style or trend. I use the existing languages of art, through which something can then be read. In my opinion it does not make sense anymore to work in avantgardist categories. Particularly when it comes to architecture and urban structures artists tend to take it on as a language of the contemporary. I once choose the term ‚revantgarde’ to define my practice. Of course, it’s a risk ...