Born in Cuba in 1970, Hernández moved to Europe in 2003 and currently lives and works between Havana and Düsseldorf

Solos

Power Pencil Solo exhibition at Paolo Maria Deanesi Gallery, Rovereto. Text by Luiggi Meneghelli

I left because I wanted to know more, learn and do more. I believe our own freedom is more important that any other kind of freedom. Then, I was never interested into political struggle: revolutions do not exist, as they originate from destruction rather than change drive. I will never be away from my homeland. She is in my art, in the draw of memory with which I produce my ...

Objects of Ridicule Solo exhibition at Alexander & Bonin, NY

n exhibition of new work by Diango Hernández will open on December 1st at Alexander and Bonin. This will be the artist’s second one-person exhibition at the gallery. Hernández’s new work addresses conflict as a mirror reflection of political objectives onto historical surfaces. The distortions created by the reflected images of tangible examples such as borders, oil, and bombs onto the non-tangible language of prejudice, political slogans, and ideologies become, in the artist’s words, ‘objects of ridicule.’ “…Objects of Ridicule” will consist of two sculptural installations: My Symmetry and waves inside my room. My Symmetry, a series of window frames with louvers, will divide the main space into two equal parts. Each louver will be engraved ‘PATRIA O MUERTE’ on one side and ‘IN GOD WE TRUST’ on the other. The louvers can be rotated individually to create either a consistent wall of one motto or a mixed wall of both the Cuban and U.S. national maxims, allowing for different interpretations of the ideological role of this installation. ‘Waves inside my room’ is a suspended ceiling made of 280 wooden, 1950s-style radio backs. This work also acts as a division of space, but in this case, the mirrored image on the opposite side is hidden. waves inside my room reflects the complicated relationship created by the exertion of dominance by the Northern Hemisphere over the Southern Hemisphere. This installation allows the visitor to become the vehicle through which news, opinions, and propaganda are communicated. ...

Fruits of evil Solo booth at ArtBasel Miami with Galería Pepe Cobo

“The Weird, the Wild and the Wonderful (An Art Basel Wrap-up)” by Elizabeth Fernández ruits of Evil, an installation piece by Diango Hernández, drew my attention as I stepped into the convention center. It definitely stood out, the forest of black half-filled light bulbs in stark contrast to the white walls of the exhibitors’ booths, but it left me asking what one would do with such a work once purchased. As evocative as it was, I could not imagine any practical way of displaying the work outside of a gallery or a museum. Frequently throughout the day, I found myself struck by the impracticality of so much of Art Basel. The show possesses a delightful sort of uselessness. The experience itself is reason enough for its existence, and that holds true for the artwork as well… ...

Dictators Solo exhibition at Galerie Frehrking Wiesehöfer, Cologne

“Varadero Beach” by Diango Hernández aradero beach and Guantánamo bay by Diango Hernández. Domestic objects twisted by political slogans, so twisted that they became art pieces. Dictators sometimes make us happy and sometimes very sad. They produce anthems, huge monuments, walls and wars, they have the power to be our only god and they last longer than marble. This exhibition presents a group of “phrases and drawings” that reflect the relation between the dictators and the hope of their victims; showing the art field as a space where personal testimonies can be revealed and can be as effective as they are on my notebook. In the 90’s during a trip to Varadero Beach on a 21st of June I witness a “permanent sunset”; the sun stayed longer than usual on the horizon, it was immovable, half of it was under the water and the other half was burning in the sky, transforming the Varadero beach into a red beach. The sun didn’t move but we did. Sunsets are always romantic (see Glen Rubsamen paintings); for some reason sunsets come in the same package as love does, no matter if the love is real or paid. The 21st of June is also the longest day in Cuba and it is usually a very beautiful summer day, if you go to Varadero Beach you will see how during this day the blue sky becomes beach and how the beach becomes a place without Cubans. Guantánamo bay and Varadero Beach, for completely different reasons, are the only two pieces of Cuban land that Cubans are not allow to step on. I didn’t go to Guantánamo City, it always was, and still is today too faraway from my hometown.  I got to know at school about the Guantánamo’s American military base but somehow neither books or teachers seduced me enough to travel there; nevertheless I knew about the 2 meter high fence that surrounds the American occupied area and I knew also that people living in the villages around the military base can reach American television channels using ordinary antennas but nobody can’t get closer to the Military Base perimeter because it is all sheltered with anti-personnel landmines. One day reading a Cuban magazine from the 70’s, I discovered a full page picture of an American soldier showing his ass to a Cuban coastguard that was standing just in the other side of the fence; the magazine article talked about a series of provocations by American soldiers towards Cuban coastguards, provocations that ended up with the death of a Cuban coastguard shot by an American sniper. I cut out the picture of the American soldier’s ass and I glued it into my songbook just there beside the lyrics of Guantanamera. Guajira Guantanamera (1928, “Countryside girl from Guantánamo”) is perhaps the best known Cuban song and it tells the story of a beautiful girl born in Guantánamo.  This song has a very particular structure and history, it doesn’t just have one composer, it has been modified over time; neither its rhythm or its melody has changed so much but its lyric, in the internationally known version the song includes the first poem in the collection Simple Verses by Cuban poet and National hero José Martí, also known as “El apostol” (The apostle). José Martí has a monument in the Central Park in Havana as well as in Central Park in New York. In the evening of the 3rd of March of 1949 three drunk Americans marines climbed up and pissed on the José Martí’s Havana monument. The next morning after the incident, the picture of the three white uniformed American marines on top of the white marble monument was the highlight of couple of national newspapers. If you have a closer look at that picture you will recognize how bizarre it is, the marines look like three monkeys on top of a white tree, but the most amazing thing about it is how the marines became part of the monument and as a result part of our daily life. Since I glued the picture of the American solder’s ass into my songbook next to the Guantanamera lyrics I always have fantasized what this beautiful girl from Guantánamo and José Martí would think about the American soldier’s ass, and I am quite sure that they would have a very different opinion about it. ...

Spies Solo exhibition at Alexander and Bonin, NY

iango Hernández’ first exhibition in North America will open at Alexander and Bonin on April 15, 2006. Spies will be shown concurrently with Traitors at Galería Pepe Cobo in Madrid. Born in 1970 in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba, the artist has lived in Europe since 2003. The work in both exhibitions reflect his analysis of the iconography and rhetoric of the Cuban revolution and the tensions and absurdities of the North American-Cuban relationship since the 1960`s. The exhibition is a group of “reports to the enemy” that reflects the relationship between an artist and a spy. For his exhibition at Alexander and Bonin, the artist has created works incorporating found objects such as record players, speakers and domestic furniture as well as language and sound. Drawing (Presidents’ secrets), upside down lamps project transcriptions of secret phone conversations between Kennedy, Rusk, McNamara, Johnson and others onto an installation of record players set on coffee tables. Drawing (living inside my drawers) is a small cabinet on whose open drawers two texts are projected: speeches given by John Kennedy at the time of the missile crisis in 1962 and by Fidel Castro concerning the US spy flights over Cuba. This work also includes a piano composition by the Cuban composer, Ernesto Lecuona. Wake me up is a series of ten drawings in which inkjet images of the ten American presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to George Bush are combined with an ink self-portrait of the artist asleep on their shoulders. Rather than an ‘iron’ or a ‘bamboo’ curtain, Hernández will exhibit Paper Curtain in which partially burned holes reveal small drawings and the text, “After some time, democracy is just another utopia, but I have already a better utopia to dream with”. In 1994, Diango Hernández began his artistic practice in Cuba as a co-founder of Ordo Amoris Cabinet, a group of artists and designers who focused on invented solutions for home design objects by Cuban citizens compensating for a permanent shortage of materials and goods. Diango Hernández lives and works in Düsseldorf. His work has been the subject of recent solo exhibitions at the Städtischen Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach and Kunsthalle, Basel. A video and sound installation was included in Always a little Further at the 2005 Venice Biennale and he will exhibit in the forthcoming Biennale of Sydney (June) and São Paulo Biennial (October). ...

The Museum of Capitalism Solo exhibition curated by Susanne Titz at Altes Museum, Mönchengladbach, Germany

“Diango Hernández, Museum of Capitalism” by Doris Krystof ch freue mich sehr über die Einladung von Susanne Titz und Hubertus Wunschik, zur Eröffnung des „Museum of Capitalism“ zu sprechen, das der aus Kuba stammende Künstler Diango Hernández im alten Museum von Mönchengladbach eingerichtet hat. Diango Hernández hält sich zur Zeit im Rahmen des durch die Josef und Hilde Wilberz – Stiftung geförderten städtischen Stipendiums in Mönchengladbach auf. Er ist einer jener jungen Künstler, die ständig unterwegs sind, permanent die Orte wechseln, die „zwischen den Welten“ unterwegs sind. „Zwischen den Welten“, im Falle von Diango Hernández kann man das mit Fug und Recht sagen, denn seit mehreren Jahren pendelt er zwischen Kuba und Europa. Im Sozialismus der Karibikinsel aufgewachsen, hat er in den letzten Jahren bei seinem Bruder im italienischen Trento gelebt, dann mehrere Monate in Spanien verbracht, und nun, hier im Rheinland schliessen sich gewissermaßen die Kreise. Denn Diango Hernández ist als Künstler im Rheinland bei weitem kein Unbekannter: 1998 realisierte er eine aufsehenerregnde Installation aus hängenden Antennen und einer aus vier polnischen Ladas zusammengebauten kubanischen Stretch-Limousine im Ludwigforum in Aachen, im Anschluss daran war er mehrfach – mit hinreißenden Zeichnungen oder einer wüsten Installation aus banalen weißen Plastikstühlen – in der Kölner Galerie Frehrking Wiesehöfer zu sehen, und im vergangenen Jahr war Diango Hernández an der um die Musik von Mouse on Mars konzipierten Ausstellung „doku/fiction“ in der Kunsthalle Düsseldorf beteiligt. Manch einer mag sich aktuell aber auch an Diango Hernández‘ Beitrag für die diesjährige Biennale in Venedig erinnern: die Soundinstallation „Palabras“ („Worte“), die in der ehemaligen Seilerei im Arsenal im Rahmen der von Rosa Martinez kuratierten Ausstellung „Sempre un piu lontano“ – „Immer ein bißchen weiter“ gezeigt wird. „Palabras“ besteht aus der Installation von sechs umgekippten, hölzernen Strommasten, die noch mit diesen altertümlichen Porzellanköpfen versehen sind. Die abgelösten Stromkabel ragen dabei frei in den Raum, sehen aus wie in die Luft gezeichnete Kringel oder Schleifen. Dazu erscheint auf der dahinterliegenden Ziegelwand eine Text-Projektion: Einem Film-Abspann im Kino vergleichbar, läuft eine Liste mit den Amtszeiten sämtlicher kommunistischer Machthaber. Bei vielen Namen der neueren Geschichte liest man  „( xy  -1989)“, nur als die Reihe an Fidel Castro kommt, erscheint da: „(1959-)“. Das Ensemble aus gefällten Strommasten und Filmprojektion wird von einer herzergreifenden italienischen Schlagermusik aus den 60er Jahren begleitet. Politik und Poesie gehen in dieser eindrucksvollen Arbeit eine ganz besondere, für Diango Hernández typische Mischung eingehen. Es ist eine politische künstlerische Haltung, die aufklärerisch agiert und zugleich mit eminenter Leichtigkeit das Rätselhafte und Mysteriöse berührt. Die für Mönchengladbach entstandene Ausstellung schließt in mehrfacher Hinsicht an die Biennale-Arbeit an. Auch hier im alten Museum verbindet sich das starke politische Interesse des Künstlers mit einer ausgesprochen poetischen Haltung und einer großen Sensibilität gegenüber dem Ort. Vielleicht ist es bereits diese Verbindung, die an Marcel Broodthaers denken lässt, dessen Verständnis von „Poesie als Störung von Weltordnung“, von „Poesie als indirekte politische Frage“ Grundlage seines bildkünstlerischen Werks gewesen ist. Der Gedanke an Broodthaers liegt aber auch deswegen nahe, weil er genau hier in diesen Räumen unter Johannes Cladders eine wichtige Ausstellung gehabt hat, die auch um das Thema Museum kreiste. „Poesie als Störung von Weltordnung“, „Poesie als indirekte politische Frage“ – Auch in den Arbeiten von Diango Hernández geht es vielfach um Worte, um Sprache als Kommunikationsmittel, um Musik zur Übermittlung von Stimmungen, und um die verschiedensten technischen Hilfen bei der Vermittlung von Kommunikation. So spielen immer wieder das Radio eine Rolle, der Plattenspieler, Lautsprecher und Verstärker, und immer wieder taucht die Antenne als Zeichen für das Senden und Empfangen von Botschaften auf. Dabei hat die Ambivalenz von Glaube an die emanzipative Kraft von Sprache einerseits und die Skepsis gegenüber der verführerischen Rhetorik der Macht andererseits die künstlerische Arbeit von Diango Hernández stark geprägt. Diese Ambivalenz kommt auch in dieser Ausstellung deutlich zum Ausdruck: so etwa am Beispiel einer der neuesten Kommunikationsmedien, dem Internet. Diango Hernández‘ „Museum of Capitalism“ ist ein Projekt für, mit und über das Internet. Gibt man www.museumofcapitalism.com ein, gelangt man auf eine Seite, die der Startseite der Suchmaschine Google nachempfunden ist, genau gesagt der US-amerikanischen Google-Seite. Dort hat Diango Hernández als Suchbegriff das Wort „Freedom“ (Freiheit) eingegeben und das absurde Ergebnis von 136 Millionen Treffern erzielt. Unterschiedslos rubriziert die Suchmaschine Seiten mit hoch politischen Inhalten neben Inseraten für Freeclimbing oder Surfclubs. Unter der Option „pictures“ hat Diango Hernández schließlich unterschiedlichste Bilder zum Suchbegriff Freiheit versammelt und damit eine Zuordnung von Bild und Begriff mit beinahe Magritte’schem Anstrich zu Wege gebracht. Zusammen mit den Ausdrucken der Freedom-Übersichtsseiten wurden die gegoogelten Freiheitsbilder in dem gerade erschienenen Buch „Museum of Capitalism“ publiziert. Ein Teil der Ausdrucke der Übersichtsseiten findet sich hier im Treppenhaus an der Wand installiert und markiert damit den Auftakt zu der nach diesem Netz-Projekt benannten Ausstellung „Museum of Capitalism“. In der schieren Menge der Einträge des Internets wölbt sich der Begriff „Freiheit“ zu einem nicht mehr zu bewältigenden Berg an Information auf. Inkomensurabel damit ist die subjektive Erfahrung von Unfreiheit, wie sie etwa im nahezu vollständigen Verbot des Internets in Kuba zum Ausdruck kommt und die scheinbare Grenzenlosigkeit des Netzes relativiert. Wenn das Internet als Inbegriff der globalen Vernetzung nichts anderes als eine chaotische Fülle der Information generiert, steht dem eine durch individuelle Vernunft geregelte Ordnung der Dinge gegenüber, die allerdings neu zu verhandeln ist. Stichwort: „Poesie als Störung der Weltordnung“, um noch einmal auf Broodthaers zurückzukommen. Und wie Broodthaers greift Diango Hernández auf die Vorstellung vom Museum als eine der ältesten Ordnungsmaschinerien unserer Kultur zurück und spielt noch einmal durch, was es zu bewahren, zu betrachten und zu vermitteln gilt. Hilfestellung dabei gibt eine gewisse Guerillataktik, die ins Museum Dinge einschleust, die an Kunst erinnern, aber doch etwas anderes meinen. Gleich zu Beginn im ersten Raum eine skulpturale Installation aus Tischen mit dem Titel „Amplified Secret“ – Vergrößertes Geheimnis (das klingt schon wieder nach René Magritte, diesem Taktiker der Verstörung!). Eine Reihe umgestürzter und auf einer diagonal durch den Raum verlaufenden Linie arrangierter Schultische bildet eine halbhohe Wand. Die Tische stammen aus Mönchengladbach und Umgebung, weisen Gebrauchsspuren auf, ...