Diango Hernández, who are you? Define yourself?

I am a visual artist. I was born in Cuba in 1970 and I currently live and work in Germany. I consider myself an explorer and, in the fashion of Jacques Yves Cousteau or, Roald Amundsen, I enjoy my aesthetic explorations and voyages through the history of art.

What about is your art practice? Which type of art do you use?

Since I started thinking of art and later making art, I assumed art as a sort of adventure. Since then, art has been challenging me in every possible way. My art practice has been guided from the beginning by my observations of the places that I have chosen to travel and live in. A big part of my reflections and fabrications come from the years I lived in Cuba. My entire oeuvre is often seen within the conceptual art tradition, though I feel closer to definitions of other sorts, such as, W.G. Sebald’s “poetic truth” *1.

Can you present your exhibit “Eugene”, which seems to be very interesting? Who is/was Eugene? Why do you choose him as subject? What represents nature for you?

“Eugene” probably is the most complex of all articulations I have created yet. When I say complex, I mean that even I, myself, get lost in the ‘weaving’ of it. On one hand “Eugene” is a homage to Eugene von Gundlach *2 a fictional character I’ve created in 2013 for an exhibition called “Socialist Nature” and on the other hand “Eugene” is about the adventure of growing up. The scale of us, the scale of the world that surround us, and travelling back and forth between those different scales, is the framing around this exhibition. Maybe the best way to understand “Eugene” is to see a heart in motion, the heart contracts (systole) and relaxes (diastole). One complete sequence is called a heartbeat. The exhibition “Eugene” as a heartbeat, is a model of motion that interest me deeply. There is not only distance between departure and arrival, there is emotional displacement *3.

Tell us some words about your book “The book of waves”? i find it very beautiful, wonderful and so inspiring. Where can we buy it?

“The Book of Waves” *4 is the title of a new body of works that I created for my second solo exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary in London. These works (The Wave Paintings, the Revolutionary Sunsets and the Ex-Tropical Fruits) are all translations. For years, I’ve been writing short stories that have as a finality to become paintings, drawings or installations. In that sense, those stories have been always as uncompleted as my exhibitions. In my work, what you physically see in the exhibition space has always had a hidden story there to be discovered. Perhaps something, that once known, could change what you think of what you just saw. “The Book of Waves” opens a different ‘door’ in this regard because it allows you, from the beginning, to tell that there is something else. You as a viewer could see words or, a sort of language but the only possible way to ‘read’ these words, is by the use of the vocabulary of painting. I love to describe the experience of this exhibition, as a day on a strange beach.

What about the exhibit “Apparently hours” you curated early this year via Lonelyfingers? Tell us about the various artistic works and artists your presented?

This year, Anne Pöhlmann and myself opened a ‘Lonelyfingers’ workspace *5 with an exhibition titled “Apparently Yours”. This exhibition displayed a collection of found collages on paper, dubiously made by Dada artists – all dated in between 1920’s and 1940’s – like, “Zero Dollar” (lithographs executed between 1978 and 1984) by conceptual Brazilian artist Cildo Meireles, and “I AM NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE”,  a work by the collaboration experience LaBeouf, Rönkkö & Turner. All these works shared something very important. They shared doubt. That strange feeling we have inside when something extraordinary has just happened to us. In every extraordinary discovery there are recurrent questions that we ask ourselves: ‘is this real?’, ‘is this happening to me?’ But the answers, almost as an act of revenge, only arrive later. In a conversation with London-based artists Luke Turner and Nastja Rönkkö we talked about fantastical, apparitions and abductions and we shared with enthusiasm our common attraction to extraordinary events. It is true that extraordinary events give us a particular kind of hope and make us feel somehow special but also, and most importantly for us, an extraordinary event must make us feel lucky. For this exhibition Timotheus Vermeulen wrote a text in which he brings back ‘promise’ as something perhaps worth reconsidering. “(…) As we all know – for I’d imagine many of us would prefer a Van Gogh above a Breitner for reasons not always pious – however, this model has become surprisingly rare. In this sense, Apparently Yours is a plea for a return to the promise and the premise of modernity, for an art that reinvigorates: not all of us, but you, that inspires and encourages you; that is always already, apparently yours.” *6

Notes: 1. “You adulterate the truth as you write. There isn’t any pretense that you try to arrive at the literal truth. And the only consolation when you confess to this flaw is that you are seeking to arrive at poetic truth, which can be reached only through fabrication, imagination, stylization. What I’m striving for is authenticity; none of it is real.” W.G. Sebald
2. “(…) In the solo exhibition Socialist Nature, Diango Hernández traces the steps of fictional adventurer-photographer Eugene von Gundlach, who in the 1960s and 70s travelled to socialist countries to document the effect of ideology on the natural reserves: forests, trees, animals, fruits. Hernández’s pursuit of von Gundlach is careful yet capricious, covering the German’s secret diaries, encrypted maps and video footage of the jungle, but also paintings of fruits he may have seen in the restaurants he ate in or the hotels he slept in during his trips (…)”, “Spiritual Discovery” by Timotheus Vermeulen for “Socialist Nature”, book published by DISTANZ. Source: http://diangohernandez.com/spiritual-discovery/
3. A displacement is the shortest distance from the initial to the final position of a point P. Thus, it is the length of an imaginary straight path, typically distinct from the path actually travelled by P. A displacement vector represents the length and direction of this imaginary straight path.4. “The Book of Waves”, at Marlbrough Contemporary until 5 June 2015. For more information about the catalogue and exhibition please visit. http://marlboroughcontemporary.com/about/
5. Lonelyfingers is an online platform created in 2012 by visual artists Diango Hernández and Anne Pöhlmann. Lonelyfingers interest focuses on the objects and documents that accompany and inspire artists while developing an artwork. http://www.lonelyfingers.com/
6. “To the promise” by Timotheus Vermeulen. This text accompanies the lonelyifngers exhibition Apparently Yours. Source: http://www.lonelyfingers.com/to-the-promise-timotheus-vermeulen/
  L.ART en Loire 9

 

Diango Hernandez, qui es-tu? Comment te définirais-tu?

Je suis un artiste visuel. Je suis né à Cuba en 1970 et je vis et travaille actuellement en Allemagne. Je me considère comme un explorateur, et à la manière de Jacques Yves Cousteau ou de Roald Amundsen.  J’aime mes explorations esthétiques et mes voyages à travers l’histoire de l’art.

Quel est le sujet/ l’objet de ta pratique artistique? Quel type d’art pratiques-tu?

Depuis le jour où j’ai commencé à penser à l’art, et plus tard lorsque j’ai commencé à en faire, je suis parti du principe que l’art était une aventure. Depuis lors, l’art est un défi que je relève dans toutes ses possibilités. Ma pratique artistique est guidée depuis le commencement par les observations que j’ai faites des endroits où j’ai choisi de voyager et de vivre.

Une grande part de mes réflexions et créations viennent des années où je vivais à Cuba. Mon oeuvre entière est souvent vue comme se situant dans la tradidion de l’art conceptuel, bien que je me sente proche des définitions d’autres types d’arts, tel que la “vérité poétique” (“poetic truth”) de W.G. Sebald[1].

Peux-tu présenter ton exposition «Eugène» («Eugene») qui semble si intéressante?  Qui est/était Eugène? pourquoi l’avoir choisi comme sujet d’exposition?

“Eugène” est probablement la plus complexe de toutes les “articulations” que j’ai créée à ce jour. Quand je dis complexe, je veux dire, que même moi, je me suis perdu dans le “tissage” de l’œuvre. D’une part, “Eugène” est un hommage à Eugène  von Gundlach[2], un personnage de fiction que j’ai créé en 2013 pour l’exposition “Nature Socialiste” (“Socialist Nature”) et d’autre part “Eugène” traite de cette aventure qu’est grandir.

Notre échelle humaine, l’échelle du monde qui nous entoure, et le voyage de va-et-vient entre ses différentes échelles  sont la clé de la composition de cette exposition.  Peut-être que la meilleure façon de comprendre “Eugène” est de visualiser un cœur en mouvement, le cœur qui se contracte (systole) et qui se relâche (diastole). Une séquence complète est appelée “battement de cœur”. L’exposition “Eugène” tel un battement de cœur, est un exemple de mouvement, qui m’intéresse profondément. Ce n’est pas seulement une distance qu’il y a entre le départ et l’arrivée, c’est aussi un déplacement émotionnel[3].

Dis nous quelques mots à propos de ton livre “the book of waves” (“le livre des vagues”). Je l’ai trouvé très beau, génial et très inspirant. Où peut-on l’acheter?

«Le Livre des Vagues »[4] (« The Book of Waves ») est le titre d’une nouvelle œuvre  que j’ai créée pour ma deuxième exposition solo à Marlborough Contemporary à Londres. Ces travaux (The Wave Paintings, the Revolutionary Sunsets et the Ex-Tropical Fruits) sont tous des traductions. Depuis des années, j’ai écrit des nouvelles, qui ont comme finalités de devenir des peintures, des dessins ou des installations. En ce sens, ces histoires sont toujours aussi inachevées que mes expositions. Dans mon travail ce que tu vois physiquement dans l’espace d’exposition a toujours eut une histoire cachée à découvrir. Peut-être qu’une chose, une fois révélée, pourrait changer notre manière d’envisager ce que l’on ne fait que voir. « The Book of Waves» ouvre, dans cette optique,  une « porte » différente, car il t’autorise dès le commencement, à dire qu’il y a quelque chose d’autre. En tant que spectateur, tu pourrais voir des mots ou une sorte de langage, mais le seul moyen possible de lire ces mots est l’usage du vocabulaire de la peinture. J’aime décrire l’expérience de cette exposition, comme une journée sur une plage étrange.

Et à propos de l’exposition « Apparently Yours », dont tu as été le curateur cette année, via Lonelyfingers? Parle-nous des divers travaux artistiques et des artistes que tu as présentés?

Cette année, Anne Pöhlmann et moi-même avons ouvert un espace de travail « Lonelyfingers »[5] avec une exposition intitulée « Apparently Yours ». Cette exposition montrait une collection de collages créés sur du papier, réalisés sous l’aune du doute par des artistes Dada – tous datés entre les années 1920 et 1940-, tout comme des œuvres telles que « Zero dollar » (lithographies exécutées entre 1978 et 1984) par l’artiste conceptuel brésilien Cildo Meireles, et « I AM NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE » un travail du collectif LaBeouf, Ronkko, Turner. Tous ces travaux partagent quelque chose d’important. Ils partagent le doute. Ce sentiment étrange que nous ressentons quand quelque chose d’extraordinaire est en train de nous arriver. En chaque découverte extraordinaire, il y a des questions récurrentes que nous nous posons : est-ce réel ? Cela m’arrive-t-il?

Mais les réponses, quasiment comme un acte de revanche, arrivent seulement plus tard. Dans une conversation avec les artistes basés à Londres que sont Luke Turner et Nastja Sade Ronkko, nous avons parlé du fantastique, des apparitions, et des enlèvements, et nous avons partagé avec enthousiasme notre attirance commune pour les évènements extraordinaires. Il est vrai que les évènements extraordinaires nous donnent un genre particulier d’espoir, et nous font nous sentir d’une certaine manière spéciaux, mais aussi et plus important pour nous, un évènement extraordinaire nous fait nous sentir chanceux.

Pour l’exposition, Timotheus Vermeulen a écrit un texte dans lequel il rétablit la « promesse » comme quelque chose de méritant peut être d’être reconsidéré. « (…) Comme nous le savons tous – de la même manière j’imagine que beaucoup d’entre nous préfèreraient un Van Gogh à un Breitner pour des raisons pas toujours pieuses- peu  importe comment, ce modèle est devenu étonnamment rare. En ce sens, Apparently Yours  est un appel pour un retour de la promesse, et de la promesse de la modernité, pour un art qui redynamise : pas nous tous, mais toi, qui t’inspire et t’encourage, ce qui est tout le temps maintenant apparemment tien. »[6]

Notes: [1] “You adulterate the truth as you write. There isn’t any pretense that you try to arrive at the literal truth. And the only consolation when you confess to this flaw is that you are seeking to arrive at poetic truth, which can be reached only through fabrication, imagination, stylization. What I’m striving for is authenticity; none of it is real.” W.G. Sebald
[2] “(…) In the solo exhibition Socialist Nature, Diango Hernández traces the steps of fictional adventurer-photographer Eugene von Gundlach, who in the 1960s and 70s travelled to socialist countries to document the effect of ideology on the natural reserves: forests, trees, animals, fruits. Hernández’s pursuit of von Gundlach is careful yet capricious, covering the German’s secret diaries, encrypted maps and video footage of the jungle, but also paintings of fruits he may have seen in the restaurants he ate in or the hotels he slept in during his trips (…)”, “Spiritual Discovery” par Timotheus Vermeulen pour “Socialist Nature”, livre publié par DISTANZ. Source: http://diangohernandez.com/spiritual-discovery/
[3] Un déplacement est la plus courte distance entre la position initiale et la position finale d’un point P.  Par conséquent, c’est la longueur d’un chemin direct imaginaire, typiquement distinct du chemin réel  parcouru par P. Un vecteur de déplacement représente la distance et la direction de ce chemin direct imaginaire.
[4] “The Book of Waves”, à Marlbrough Contemporary jusqu’au 5 juin 2015. Pour plus d’informations à propos du catalogue et de l’exposition, vous êtes invités à consulter:  http://marlboroughcontemporary.com/about/
[5] . Lonelyfingers est une plateforme en ligne créée en 2012 par les artites plasticiens Diango Hernandez et Anne Pohlmann. L’intérêt de Lonelyfingers se focalise sur les objets et les documents qui accompagnent at inspire les artistes pendant qu’il’ développent un travail artistique.  http://www.lonelyfingers.com/
[6] “To the promise” par Timotheus Vermeulen. Ce texte accompagne l’exposition de Lonelyfingers “Apparently Yours”. Source: http://www.lonelyfingers.com/to-the-promise-timotheus-vermeulen/
  L.ART en Loire 9
Images from “Eugene” Diango Hernández solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Münster
“Eugene” Diango Hernández solo exhibition 30. June – 6. September 2015
Kunsthalle Münster
Hafenweg 28
48155 Münster
Germany
kulturamt@stadt-muenster.de
Kunsthalle Münster | supported by Friends of the Kunsthalle Münster | The exhibition is supported by Ministerium für Familie, Kinder, Jugend, Kultur und Sport des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen

lartloire_9_tek-hernandez-1