Commemorating Hurricanes Salon 2014 / 2015 Jahresgaben-Ausstellung, Kunstverein Nürnberg, Germany

Diango Hernández (*1970, Sancti Spìritus, Kuba; lebt in Düsseldorf) hat im Kunstverein Nürnberg dieses Jahr die Einzelausstellung „In hazard, translated“ präsentiert. In dieser hat er skulpturale Assemblagen ausgelegt, die sich mit einer vielschichtigen Lesbarkeit von Geschichte beschäftigen. Ausgehend von dem historischen Ereignis eines Hurrikans, der 1932 die Südostküste Kubas zerstört hat, entwickelte er eigene bildliche Übersetzungen, um einen differenzierten Blick auf die gegenwärtige Situation in seinem Heimatland sowie in Europa zu werfen.
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WE lonelyfingers Anne Pöhlmann and Diango Hernández talking about lonelyfingers 22nd. April 2014, 7pm at Kunstverein Nürnberg

Lonelyfingers founders Anne Pöhlmann and Diango Hernández open a conversation about the reasons why they decided to create an online platform for artists. We artists create “things” that haunt us for the rest of our lives. They are the living proofs of our developments, understandings and also our mistakes. The objects we have created function like an inseparable extension of our experiences and life circumstances. They seem to be of our property but in reality they don’t belong to us…
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A drawing after life. Simone Neuenschwander in conversation with Diango Hernández for "In hazard, translated" Diango Hernández solo exhibition at Kunstverein Nürnberg

A natural cataclysm is by itself not related with any form of ideology; it happens due to natural forces and can only be predicted up to a certain extent. Besides all the calamities brought on by events like hurricanes, they can also produce positive outcomes — one important one is how they bring people together. Under their devastating influences, people understand each other’s circumstances and problems and are willing to contribute and help out without asking for remuneration. The spirit that a natural catastrophe sparks is unique and transcends people’s political or ideological differences. For a few days after the passing of a hurricane, living in a city makes sense again; after those few days are gone is when “the real hurricane” called ordinary life hits us again…
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