(Waves run through Hernández's work, This motif signifies both the abstract and the concrete and is determined by poetic games as well as a clear concept)

Marlborough Contemporary

The Book of Waves: Diango Hernandez at Marlborough Contemporary by Francesco Dama Through such gentle acts of visual subversion, Hernández suggests that there is no greater teacher than nature. What is the lesson to learn, however, is what each of us is called to find out.

The waves channel a dense nucleus of themes into a poetical form, even referencing the tradition of painting, with allusions to marine art. To enhance the suggestion of landscape, three long waves painting are hung in line on the longest wall of the gallery, evoking the horizon ...

Dark Waves New works at Marlborough Contemporary, London

The amount of risk involved in the trajectory is what makes a journey different than another. There are only 90 miles between Cuba and Florida. But these 90 miles are different from many others. Salt water and sun, sharks and the Gulf Stream, make them unique. It is the first time that I have written about these 90 miles. It feels like I shouldn’t, but I have ...

Diango Hernández Explores Cuban National Identity at Marlborough Contemporary Rachel Will for BLOUINARTINFO, UK

ondon’s Marlborough Contemporary is currently hosting an exhibition featuring original works by Cuban artist Diango Hernández, in which he explores his national identity through painting and sculpture. The three-part exhibition titled “The Book of Waves” consists of new artworks that examine the challenging external perceptions of Cuba along with internal perceptions. The first part of the exhibition, from which the show is named, consists of multicolored waves that are actually an alphabetic font corresponding to Fidel Castro’s revolutionary 1961 speech “Words to Intellectuals.” Notably, Hernández’s font characters look the same, meaning that the figurative text and the artwork translate into repetitive waves that can only be interpreted in painterly terms. The second portion contains fruit sculptures with lemons painted with abstract international maritime signal flags. The use of fruit is symbolic of American imperialism enacted through the United Fruit Company’s long-lasting impact on the Cuban economy. The final work called “Sunsets” comprises a sequence of watercolors on the pages of a first edition Guerilla Warfare handbook by Ernesto “Che” Guevara. On display will be a landscape drawing on tracing paper affixed directly to the gallery wall based on an illustration from the same manuscript. Hernández argues that the theme of national identity unifies all Cuban artists, even those in who have left. And, since leaving the island nation, the Düsseldorf-based artist has been actively absorbed with Cuba by exploring means that socialist philosophy denies or promotes an aesthetic or spiritual experience. BLOUINARTINFO, UK The Book of Waves continues at Marlbrough Contemporary until 5 June 2015. Marlborough Contemporary 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY +44 (0)20 7629 5161 marlboroughcontemporary.com photo: Francis Ware   ...

“I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Group exhibition at Marlborough Contemporary, London

I never thought I’d see you again. Where have you been until now? Well how are you? how have you been? It’s a long time since we last met. Roxy Music, “Chance Meeting” “ never thought I’d see you again” is not exactly about history painting. Neither obliged to any style, nor explicitly referential to particular precedents, the exhibition begins with the premise that painting, more than any medium, is always driven by its own genres. Painting is persistent in the history of art precisely because of the specificity of the styles and idioms it adopts or quotes. Even if contemporary painting is underpinned by a conceptual framework, it is almost impossible to avoid some reference to that almost infinite list of established modes – landscape, portrait, still life, formalist, expressionist, to name a few. But rather than painting being a reiteration of its past, the recognition of, and resistance to, these conventions makes it a site of constant renewal. No longer bound to such polarities as figuration or abstraction, contemporary practice takes the idea of painting as a given. It co-opts genres without hierarchy or priority, and as a type of shorthand or economy of expression. That is to say, we recognise something in the ‘style’ of the painting. We speak its language, because many of the conventions of painting are all around us in the visual information we negotiate every day. We recognise the conventions, from perspective to painterly gesture, even if those conventions are put to work for different purposes. And it is less about what an image in the painting might convey, than the means through which that image or gesture is achieved. The exhibition does not try to find a unified style for painting today, but recognises that there are modes in which the painter may operate, perhaps without long-term commitment, but also without irony. Painting is never without reference, context or precedent. It always carries with it many memories and legacies and at the same time appears thoroughly regenerated. “I never thought I’d see you again” Painting History Mike Bouchet and Paul McCarthy, Jason Brooks, Agnieska Brzeżańska, Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, Pamela Golden, Diango Hernández, Natelle Jubelin, Koen van den Broek, Ian Whittlesea 21 January – 27 February 2015 Private View: 20 January 2015 ...
By all means I am here

By all means I am here Solo booth curated by Katerina Gregos at Art Brussels 2014 with Marlborough Contemporary

“I move accompanied” by Diango Hernández ere I am moving in between to parallel lines, one has been drawn inside and the other hasn’t been located yet but certainly my body moves strangely back and forth trying to find it. Four walls, in this case not imaginary walls have defined the complete space; they are made out of bricks and painted in white. I have been here before, many times, too many. I know this space too well, better than I know myself, I move again trying to occupy a spot that I think I did not occupied before. In a previous letter I mentioned him and I am convinced that I have shown you images of his work before but it doesn’t matter now, anyway here I am sending you a small clip of one of his early works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qml505hxp_c In an imaginary space I move accompanied only by my memory -inside this space I perform- and out there somewhere, you exist. These two spaces are well defined by both, imaginary and real walls but there is something else that stays permanently in between us, something that we agreed on calling distance. My space is not approachable but nevertheless you can see me from where you are and that allows me to be invisible of course not for you nor for the others but for myself. It is only by the absent performer and the presence and persistence of the viewer that memory reveals its more interesting face. When I realized that you, the viewer was looking for me, in that same moment I became you and by that I mean the reality vanished. Sat 25 – Mon 27 April Art Brussels 2014   ...